Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site

Brown v. Board of Education NHS
Former Monroe Elementary School, Topeka, Kansas

nps

The story of Brown v. Board of Education, which ended legal segregation in public schools, is one of hope and courage. The plaintiffs in the case never knew they would change history. The people who make up this story were ordinary people. They were teachers, secretaries, welders, ministers and students who simply wanted to be treated equally.

This National Historic Site contains Monroe Elementary School, the all-black school that main plaintiff, Linda Brown, attended. On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court unanimously declared that separate educational facilities are inherently unequal and, as such, violate the 14th Amendment of the United States Constitution, which guarantees all citizens "equal protection of laws." The U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education (1954) is one of the most pivotal opinions ever rendered by that body. This landmark decision highlights the U.S. Supreme Court's role in affecting changes in national and social policy. Often when people think of the case, they remember a little girl whose parents sued so that she could attend an all-white school in her neighborhood. In reality, the story of Brown v. Board of Education is far more complex.

On October 26, 1992, Congress passed Public Law 102-525 establishing Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site to commemorate the landmark Supreme Court decision aimed at ending segregation in public schools.

https://www.nps.gov/brvb/index.htm

Last updated: March 31, 2012

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Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration
Statue of Liberty National Monument

New York, NY 10004

Phone:

(212) 363-3200

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