160th Civil War Anniversary

 
Black and white photo of a bearded man in military uniform.
Ephraim Miller was shot through the lung at
Antietam and spent six months in a hospital.
Shortly after rejoining his regiment, Miller was
captured and sent to Richmond, Virginia. He
paroled, rejoined his regiment, and in May
1864 was captured a second time. Sent to
Andersonville then transferred to Florence, South Carolina. Miller finally received his freedom in February 1865.

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Black and white photo of a standing man in uniform with his hand on the back of a wooden chair.
Caleb Wallace joined the 22nd New York
Cavalry in December 1863. The next June,
he was captured by Confederate forces in
Petersburg, Virginia and was sent to
Andersonville. In the fall, most of the
healthy prisoners were sent to other camps.
Caleb was not among those – he remained
behind at Andersonville where he died on
October 17, 1864 and was buried in grave
11,061. He left behind a wife, Frances, and
four sons: Charles, William, George, and
Martin.

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Man standing beside drapes in military uniform
Freedom does not always end a prisoner's suffering. Twenty-one year old Clark Bull was captured at Missionary Ridge, Tennessee in November 1863 and sent to Richmond, Virginia. In February 1864 he was transferred to Andersonville, where he was one of the first to arrive in the nearly empty stockade. He survived his captivity, but the effects of it ended his life prematurely. His body was broken by malnutrition, and he suffered from Bright’s Disease, which ultimately claimed his life.

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Man in military uniform standing with rifle
Captivity challenges soldiers’ dedication. Born in Dublin, Ireland, Patrick Redmond enlisted as a substitute in August 1863. In February 1864 he was captured and sent to Andersonville. By the Fall, he’d had enough. He enlisted into the Confederate Army and took up arms against the United States. He was captured by the U.S. Army at the Battle of Egypt Station in December 1864 and was sent to the Federal Military Prison at Alton, Illinois. He later re-enlisted in the U.S. Army then deserted.

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Man in military uniform with rife
Aaron Moger cared for his mother. He enlisted on New Year’s Eve, 1863 into the 10th Connecticut Infantry. His widowed mother, Dorinda Moger, relied on his army pay for support at home. Just five months after he enlisted, Aaron was captured in Virginia and sent to Andersonville. On September 8, 1864, after a little more than three months in captivity, he died of a gunshot wound at Andersonville, leaving his dependent mother alone and without support. He is buried in grave 8,150.

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Man in military uniform with rifle
Francis Hubert served in the 8th Michigan Cavalry. In late July 1864, he was part of a raid led by General George Stoneman to attack the railroads and prison camps in Macon, Georgia. He was captured on July 31, 1864 near Macon and was sent to Andersonville. He was finally exchanged in February 1865 in Annapolis, Maryland.

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Man in military uniform
A farmer from Oakland, Illinois, John Ramsey joined the 21st Illinois Infantry in the summer of 1861. In September 1863 he was captured at the Battle of Chickamauga and was held prisoner in Richmond, Virginia. In the spring of 1864 he was transferred to Andersonville, where he soon died of diarrhea on May 10, 1864. He is buried in grave 1,011.

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Man in military uniform sitting in chair
Samuel Foust was captured in Virginia on May 23, 1864. He arrived at Andersonville on June 7, scrawling in his diary that day, “I dislike the place.” He never left.  While thousands were transferred to other prisons, Foust was one of the few to remain at Andersonville, where he died on November 15, 1864.  He is buried in grave 12,025

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Man in military uniform with rifle and sword
Sylvester Hooshour was almost an unknown soldier. In September 1864, he was sent from Andersonville to Atlanta as part of a prisoner exchange, and saw freedom in his grasp. However, because he was not captured in the Atlanta campaign, he was not eligible for parole under the rules of the carefully negotiated prisoner exchange. Instead he was sent back to Andersonville. But he never made it. On the train ride back, Hooshour died in Macon and was reinterred at Andersonville.

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Man in military uniform sitting.
In war, no soldier is truly safe. Cyrus Iler joined the 129th Indiana Infantry at the end of 1863 and served as the wagoner for his company, a position his wife and six children probably considered relatively safe. However, even wagon drivers are at risk in war. Cyrus was captured in May 1864 near Cartersville, Georgia and was sent to Andersonville. He died on August 22, 1864 and was buried in grave 6,444. He left behind a wife, Elmatria and six children.

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Man in military uniform standing next to column.
A Scottish-born plumber from Chicago, William B. Oliphant joined the 51st Illinois Infantry in September 1861. He was captured in Georgia in 1864 and sent to Andersonville. He was not exchanged until April 1865, and lived until 1931.

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Man in military uniform.
Sometimes the liberator becomes the captive. Albert Walker was a 21 year old carriage maker from York, Maine. In March of 1864 he participated in a raid to free prisoners in Richmond, but became a prisoner himself. He was eventually sent to Andersonville, where he died on August 29, 1864. He is buried in grave 7,226.

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Man in military uniform standing with rifle.
William Winslow was from Simsbury, Connecticut and joined the 16th Connecticut Infantry in 1863. On April 20, 1864 he, along with nearly his entire regiment, was captured at Plymouth, North Carolina and sent to Andersonville. In the fall he was transferred to a prison in Savannah, where he escaped in December 1864.

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Man in military uniform standing with rifle.
Martin Short was born in Canada, and by the outbreak of the Civil War he was a 41 year farmer in Saratoga, Minnesota. Needing bounty money, he enlisted thinking that he would be assigned to fight near his home. Instead he was sent south, where he was captured in Mississippi in June 1864. He died at Andersonville on August 17, 1864 and is buried in grave 5,941. He left behind a wife and four children.

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Man in military uniform sitting with sword
Sometimes fate is left to chance. Johnson Foster was captured in Hagerstown, Maryland on July 7, 1863, while following the Confederate Army in its retreat south after the Battle of Gettysburg. Many prisoners captured at this time were exchanged. Johnson was not so lucky, as the prisoner exchange system broke down before he could be sent back north.  He was held in Richmond and sent to Andersonville in the spring of 1864. He died on April 27, 1864, shortly after his arrival.

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Man in military uniform sitting
John Jack was a thirty six year old farmer
from Thurston, New York. He was drafted
into the army on July 1, 1863 and assigned
to the 9th New York Infantry. He soon
found himself fighting in Virginia, where he
was captured in May 1864. From there he
was sent to Andersonville, where he died of
diarrhea on September 2, 1864, and is buried
in grave 7,596.

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Man in military uniform sitting with sword
George Nailer was captured on February 26, 1863 and was exchanged a week later. He hoped this would be the last time he would lose his freedom. However in October, he was captured again and was sent to Richmond. In the spring of 1864 he was transferred to Andersonville. George wrote letters home in April and May, begging his parents to send him supplies and money. It never arrived. George died on August 7, 1864 and is buried in grave 4,936.

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Last updated: October 22, 2021

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Mailing Address:

Andersonville National Cemetery
National Prisoner of War Museum
496 Cemetery Road

Andersonville , GA 31711

Phone:

229 924-0343

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