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    Yosemite

    National Park California

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Seventeen Year Old Hiker Injured in Yosemite National Park

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Date: March 23, 2010

California Highway Patrol Assisted in Complex Rescue

At approximately 3:30 p.m. on Monday, March 22, 2010, the Yosemite Emergency Dispatch Center received a call regarding a collapsed hiker on the Upper Yosemite Fall Trail.  The hiker, a 17-year old student from Upland, California, was on a hiking trip with the Yosemite Institute.  He was with a group of approximately eight students, with several adult chaperones and instructors.  This hike is a regular part of the curriculum experienced by the students of the Yosemite Institute, a week-long residential environmental education program.

The hiker collapsed near the summit of the Upper Yosemite Fall Trail.  The trail is a strenuous, 3.5 mile hike that begins in Yosemite Valley. 

Two Yosemite National Park Rangers were dispatched to the scene to assist the hiker.  Once the Park Rangers reached the hiker, a California Highway Patrol helicopter assisted in hoisting the injured hiker.  The young man was then airlifted to the Children’s Hospital in Madera, California. 

The cause of the hiker’s collapse is unknown.

Did You Know?

Yosemite Museum

When it opened to the public on May 29, 1926, the Yosemite Museum became the first museum building in the national park system, and its educational objectives served as a model for parks nationwide. It still functions much as it was originally intended, and currently exhibits items which mainly reflect the Native occupation of Yosemite Valley and its surroundings. When in the park, you can visit with one of three cultural demonstrators who primarily staff the Museum.