• Rainbow over Half Dome

    Yosemite

    National Park California

Update for January 16, 2013

January 16, 2013 Posted by: Laura and Rob Pilewski

Weather: January 9th through January 16th
High temperature: 45°F (January 9th)
Low temperature: -22°F (January 11th)
New Snow: 5 inches
Total settled snow depth: 45 inches as of January 16th

Skiing Conditions and Weather: The cold snap that covered the Western US this week also visited Tuolumne Meadows and its icy grip could be felt for most of the week. There were three consecutive days when the low temperature was -17, -22, and -21 respectively. This cold snap was followed by strong northeast winds that have left the ski conditions variable, to say the least. There is still some soft snow to ski out there, mostly below tree line, and there is also wind board, wind crust, and a sun crust on the sunnier slopes. The good news is that there is still excellent snow coverage and if one is creative they can find powder turns and good skiing.

Avalanche and Snowpack Conditions: For the latest avalanche advisory for this area go to www.esavalanche.org for the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center and click on advisory. The ESAC site is updated several times a week and more often during weather events.

Triggering isolated wind slabs is still a possibility in the high alpine zone. High winds on January 13 and 14 transported lots of snow and formed wind slabs on most aspects above tree line. Wilderness skiers need to use caution when traversing slopes above tree line. Persistent weak layers can still be found in the snowpack, but until they are loaded with new snow, they do not pose a hazard.

Wildlife: We saw a snowshoe hare this week, and many other small mammal tracks in the newly fallen snow. A flock of red crossbills was observed near Tioga Pass, and the ravens, Clark's nutcrackers and mountain chickadees are still enjoying the solitude of Tuolumne Meadows.

Questions: The Tuolumne Meadows Ski Hut is open for the season. There is an ample supply of firewood and 10 bunks that are available on a first come, first served basis. You can call the Tuolumne Meadows Ranger Station at 209/372-0450. If you leave a message we will get back to you the first chance we get. Power and phones are frequently out of service. Contact the wilderness office at 209/372-0740 with any questions or concerns if you are unable to reach the ranger station. Come prepared; don't count on electricity or phone service at the ski hut.

Happy Skiing,
Laura and Rob Pilewski
Tuolumne Meadows Winter Rangers

Snowy peaks Lembert Dome, partially snow covered
 The Cockscomb and Altusky Point, January 9, 2013. Last light on Lembert Dome, January 14, 2013.

 


7 Comments Comments Icon

  1. kent - soquel, ca
    January 30, 2013 at 11:09

    thanks for the fine photos of the winter country there. Those twin water cracks on Lembert Dome seem filled with snow!

  2. Lynne - Burbank, CA
    January 25, 2013 at 06:27

    Love your photos. Love your reports. It's almost like being there. Thank you so much.

  3. Mark and Sandy - Pagosa Springs, CO
    January 20, 2013 at 07:48

    Thanks for the great report and pictures. It was very cold here too.

  4. Stefan - Bonn, Germany
    January 19, 2013 at 02:42

    Saw it only during summer times - but winter seems to be great too. Best NP I ever visited.

  5. seamus Shannon - san mateo, ca
    January 17, 2013 at 11:25

    Rob, heading up to Merced Lake tomorrow for3 days winter camping ,thx for the photos

  6. Steve - Ripon, Ca
    January 17, 2013 at 06:38

    Great Pictures ! I enjoy the updates. Thanks.

  7. Kathie - San Clemente, Ca
    January 17, 2013 at 11:43

    It looks beautiful! Wish we were there...much different from our last trip in August. Happy skiiing!

 

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Did You Know?

American Indians use traditional ignition methods on a prescribed fire project

The indigenous people of Yosemite Valley have used fire as a tool for thousands of years. Fire was used to encourage the growth of plants used for basket making and to promote the growth of the black oak--a sun loving species--and a staple food source for American Indians from this region.