• An aerial view of Old Faithful erupting taken from Observation Point with the Old Faithful Inn to the side.

    Yellowstone

    National Park ID,MT,WY

Create and Share

Pumpkin with the National Park Service arrowhead carved into it.

Pumpkin with the NPS arrowhead

NPS/Restivo

Carve a Pumpkin
Autumn is here, which means pumpkin carving is also here, and we want you to share your creation with us. What comes to mind when you think of Yellowstone? Is it the geysers? Maybe the diverse wildlife that live here? Perhaps something else? All you have to do is carve a pumpkin that you feel represents Yellowstone and share it with us on our Facebook page with a note explaining why you chose your subject. It's a great activity for any artist, student, or parent.
 
How to Create and Share
Follow these quick steps below and you will be on your way to creating and sharing your creation.

  • Pick a subject that you feel represents Yellowstone National Park. If you have visited Yellowstone before, think about your own experience in the park when choosing a subject.
  • Write a brief statement (no more than 3 sentences) why you chose your subject.
  • Draw your design on a pumpkin. Need inspiration? Download our free templates in PDF format.
  • Carefully carve your pumpkin. You can carve all the way through the pumpkin to see the inside of it, or you can carve the orange skin to expose the pumpkin's flesh. Kids, be sure you work with a parent or an adult.
  • Take a picture of your creation.
  • Post your picture to our Facebook page with your written statement.
  • We have a family-friendly Facebook page, so we ask that all submissions be of good taste and appropriate.
 
Templates and Images
If you need inspiration for your pumpkin or want easy access to a drawing, we have provided samples in PDF format for you. Just download it, print it out, and trace it on your pumpkin. For your reference, we have also provided an image of what your pumpkin will look like if you use our templates.
 
Grizzly bear

Grizzly bear

NPS Illustration/Warner

Grizzly bear
Grizzly bears (Ursos arctos horribilis) roam wild and free in Yellowstone, foraging, hunting, and living with other wildlife here. In fact, Yellowstone and northwest Montana are the only areas south of Canada that still have large grizzly bear populations. Bears are attracted to food and have a great sense of smell, but if bears become conditioned to eating human food, sometimes that bear needs to be removed from the ecosystem. That is not only a loss for the ecosystem, but if often diminishes a wilderness experience for people visiting. The rule of thumb is to secure all food items and to properly store them in a way that bears cannot obtain it, even our carved pumpkins.

Grizzly bear template | What this pumpkin will look like

 
Wolf

Wolf

NPS Illustration/Warner

Wolf
(Canis lupus) on the move. Many animals migrate in the fall to find warmer land with the potential for more food. Where the prey goes, predators like wolves must follow. While our little tricksters beg for treats on neighborhood streets, this year’s wolf pups will be learning how to hunt with their parents and their pack. Yellowstone gives more people opportunities to see wild wolves in their natural habitat than any other place in the world.

Wolf template | What this pumpkin will look like

 
Bison

Bison

NPS Illustration/Warner

Bison
Yellowstone is the only place in the United States where bison (Bison bison) have lived continuously since prehistoric times. This is the nation’s largest bison population on public land and among the few bison herds that have not been hybridized through interbreeding with cattle. If you have ever been to Yellowstone, chances are you have seen herds of bison. What was your first impression when you saw them?

Bison template | What this pumpkin will look like

 
Elk

Elk

NPS Illustration/Warner

Elk
Elk (Cervus elaphus) are the most abundant large mammal found in Yellowstone and one of the most photographed animals due to their huge antlers. This time of the year, bull elk (males) are courting cow elk (females) during the rut (mating season). Visitors may often hear loud bugles as bull elk announce their availability and fitness to females and to warn and challenge other bulls. When answered, bulls move toward one another and sometimes engage in battle for access to the females.

Elk template | What this pumpkin will look like

 
Park Ranger

Park Ranger

NPS Illustration/Warner

Park Ranger
Park rangers in the National Park Service are stewards and caretakers trusted with protecting and preserving the resources found in natural and cultural sites belonging to the American public. Park rangers are passionate about the work they do and believe in the mission of the National Park Service: "The National Park Service preserves unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the national park system for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations."

Park Ranger template | What this pumpkin will look like


 
Old Faithful

Old Faithful

NPS Illustration/Warner

Old Faithful
Old Faithful Geyser, an American icon, is understandably the most popular attraction in Yellowstone. Every 90 minutes or so, Old Faithful jets hot water as high as 180 ft. in the air, enchanting visitors from around the world. Each spectacular eruption may continue for as long as five minutes, but if the eruption ceases in the first 2.5 minutes, then the next eruption will happen much sooner, in about 65 minutes. Because no two eruptions are alike, many visitors never miss an opportunity to watch Old Faithful in action.

Old Faithful template | What this pumpkin will look like


 
Fox

Fox

NPS Illustration/Warner

Fox
The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) has been documented in Yellowstone since the 1880s. In relation to other canids in the park, red foxes are the smallest. Red foxes occur in several color phases, but they are usually distinguished from coyotes by their reddish yellow coat that is somewhat darker on the back and shoulders, with black "socks" on their lower legs. "Cross" phases of the red fox (a dark cross on their shoulders) have been reported a few times in recent years near Canyon and Lamar Valley.

Fox template | What this pumpkin will look like

 
Red-tailed hawk

Red-tailed hawk

NPS Illustration/Warner

Red-tailed hawk
A rusty-red tail and 4-foot wing span identify adult red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) as they soar over meadows and grasslands in Yellowstone while searching for prey. Red-tails might look familiar as these common raptors occupy similar habitat in most of North America. During September and October, nearly all red-tailed hawks nesting in Yellowstone migrate south or to lower elevation for winter.

Red-tailed hawk template | What this pumpkin will look like

Did You Know?

Upper Geyser Basin Hydrothermal Features on a Winter Day.

Yellowstone contains approximately one-half of the world’s hydrothermal features. There are over 10,000 hydrothermal features, including over 300 geysers, in the park.