• An aerial view of Old Faithful erupting taken from Observation Point with the Old Faithful Inn to the side.

    Yellowstone

    National Park ID,MT,WY

Free Entrance to Yellowstone For National Public Lands Day

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Date: September 17, 2013

National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior

Yellowstone National Park
P.O. Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190
   
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 17, 2013     13-084   

Al Nash or Dan Hottle
(307) 344-2015
YELL_Public_Affairs@nps.gov

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YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK NEWS RELEASE
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Free Entrance To Yellowstone For National Public Lands Day


The National Park Service is offering free entry to Yellowstone and all national parks on Saturday, September 28, in conjunction with National Public Lands Day.

The nation’s largest single-day volunteer effort for public lands is now in its 20th year.

A seven-day pass to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks is normally $25 for a private, non-commercial vehicle. Camping and other fees will not be waived.

The NPS is waiving entrance fees on 11 days in 2013 as a way to encourage people to get outdoors and enjoy the remarkable landscapes and historical and cultural sites national parks have to offer. 

Entrance fees will also be waived on November 9-11, which is the Veteran’s Day holiday weekend.

More information is available at http://www.nps.gov/findapark/feefreeparks.htm and http://www.publiclandsday.org/.

- www.nps.gov/yell -


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Did You Know?

Fire in Yellowstone Pineland in 1988

The 1988 fires affected 793,880 acres or 36 percent of the park. Five fires burned into the park that year from adjacent public lands. The largest, the North Fork Fire, started from a discarded cigarette. It burned more than 410,000 acres.