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Yellowstone Black Bear Lethally Removed From Campground

CanyonBear
A black bear eats a visitor's breakfast at Canyon Village Campground, June 22.
NPS Photo

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Date: June 26, 2013

National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior

Yellowstone National Park
P.O. Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190
   
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 26, 2013            13-049    

Al Nash or Dan Hottle
(307) 344-2015
YELL_Public_Affairs@nps.gov

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YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK NEWS RELEASE
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Yellowstone Black Bear Lethally Removed From Campground

A black bear that refused to leave a Yellowstone National Park campground after obtaining human food was lethally removed by Yellowstone National Park staff on Saturday evening, June 22.

At approximately 3:30 p.m. that day, a 142-pound adult male black bear entered the Canyon Campground and approached within six feet of a man and woman eating. The campers backed off and the bear ate some of their food. The bear also went through the campers’ garbage and sniffed and pawed at their tent. The bear then left the site and sniffed and pawed at other tents, bear-proof dumpsters and bear-proof food storage boxes and dug through fire pits in other campsites in the campground.

Rangers responded and hazed the bear out of the campground, but the bear returned and re-entered the campground. Due to safety concerns for park visitors, the bear was shot and killed at approximately 9:00 p.m.

Park visitors are reminded to keep food, garbage, coolers and other attractants stored in hard-sided vehicles or bear-proof food storage boxes. This helps keep bears from becoming conditioned to human foods, and helps keep park visitors and their property safe.

Hikers in bear country are encouraged to travel in groups of three or more, carry bear pepper spray, make plenty of noise on the trail, and to be alert for the presence of bears. If a bear charges during a surprise encounter, stand your ground, do not run, and use your bear pepper spray.

Park regulations require that you to stay at least 100 yards away from black and grizzly bears at all times. The best defense against bear attacks is to stay a safe distance from bears and use your binoculars, spotting scope, or telephoto lens to get a closer look.

Bear sightings should be reported to the nearest visitor center or ranger station as soon as possible.

- www.nps.gov/yell -

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Did You Know?

Lake Trout Illustration

Lake trout are an invasive species of fish that is decimating the native cutthroat trout population in Yellowstone Lake.