• A bull elk bugles in Yellowstone National Park

    Yellowstone

    National Park ID,MT,WY

Yellowstone Welcomes New Safety Manager

BrandonLipke
Brandon Lipke
Dan Hottle, NPS

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News Release Date: June 27, 2012

National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior

Yellowstone National Park
P.O. Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190
   
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 27, 2012              12-042    

Al Nash or Dan Hottle
(307) 344-2015
YELL_Public_Affairs@nps.gov

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YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK NEWS RELEASE
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Yellowstone Welcomes New Safety Manager

Yellowstone National Park is pleased to welcome Brandon Lipke as the park's new Safety Manager. He will be responsible for managing all aspects of National Park Service employee safety on the job.

He comes to Yellowstone from Mount Rainier National Park in Washington State, where he served as the Safety Manager from 2009-2012.

Brandon is originally from Fort Scott, Kansas. He spent eight years in the U.S. Coast Guard, worked for a time in the private sector, and also worked for the Federal Bureau of Prisons before joining the National Park Service.

Brandon graduated with honors from Pittsburg State University in Pittsburg, Kansas, with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Technology with an emphasis on Safety Management.

Brandon, his wife Terri, daughter Krystyn, and their three dogs now call Mammoth Hot Springs home. 

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Did You Know?

Fire in Yellowstone Pineland in 1988

The 1988 fires affected 793,880 acres or 36 percent of the park. Five fires burned into the park that year from adjacent public lands. The largest, the North Fork Fire, started from a discarded cigarette. It burned more than 410,000 acres.