• An aerial view of Old Faithful erupting taken from Observation Point with the Old Faithful Inn to the side.

    Yellowstone

    National Park ID,MT,WY

Yellowstone Fire Update: September 11, 2011

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Date: September 11, 2011

National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior

Yellowstone National Park
P.O. Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190
   
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 11, 2011   11-088f    
Al Nash or Dan Hottle (307) 344-2015

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YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK FIRE UPDATE
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Heart Complex: September 11, 2011 - 12:00 p.m.

A new lightning caused fire, the Trischman Fire, was detected Saturday afternoon and is estimated at 3-5 acres. It is located in a remote area 4.5 miles west of Shoshone Lake and 6 miles southwest of Old Faithful. This fire is being suppressed with 16 smokejumpers and supported by Yellowstone's Lama Helicopter. Even though the fire is in a remote area fire managers felt it necessary to suppress it, largely to minimize any potential impact to the Old Faithful area.

Five other lightning caused wildland fires, managed as the Heart Complex, continue to burn in the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park.

The Point Fire on the eastern shore of Yellowstone Lake is approximately 1,100 acres. It has continued to flare up in the heat of the day as it hit pockets of dead and down vegetation within the perimeter of the fire. A spot in the northeast corner of the fire burned actively Saturday and put up significant smoke. This spot is located between the the 2003 East Fire and the rest of the fire. Crews continued to monitor the fire and provide protection for the Clear Creek Cabin. Smoke will likely be visible around the eastern edge of the lake and on portions of the East Entrance road. The Thorofare Trail has been closed from the Nine Mile Trailhead to one mile south of the fire area.

The following four fires are being managed to allow natural processes to occur to enhance the area's natural resources, to protect people and property, and to effectively use available firefighting resources.

The Gibbon Fire, burning three miles southeast of Madison Junction, has seen little new fire activity and remains estimated at 16-18 acres. It has been burning since July 12th.

The Ouzel Fire is 3 acres in size and has shown little activity in the last few days. The fire is located 5 miles from the west boundary with the Caribou-Targhee National Forest.

The Huckleberry is estimated at 1-2 acres and is located 2 miles from the south boundary with the Bridger-Teton National Forest. Little activity has been seen on the fire for several days.

The Pitchstone Fire is located on Pitchstone Plateau and is less than 0.1 acre, it also has had minimal activity.

Other than limited temporary closures of some backcountry campsites and hiking trails, all park entrances, roads and services are open. None of these fires pose a threat to park visitors. When actively burning, smoke from any of these fires may be visible from park roadways.

Updated information is available 24-hours a day by calling 307-344-2580, or on the web at http://www.inciweb.org/unit/5382/. The Point Fire may also be observed from the Fire Lookout web cam on Mount Washburn at http://www.nps.gov/yell/photosmultimedia/webcams.htm.

The fire danger rating in Yellowstone is currently "Very High," and continued warm and dry weather with little precipitation is predicted for the next week. Visitors are encouraged to be careful with campfires, grills, camp stoves and smoking materials. The latest information on backcountry access is available at park Visitor Centers or Backcountry Offices.

- www.nps.gov/yell -

Did You Know?

Fire in Yellowstone Pineland in 1988

The 1988 fires affected 793,880 acres or 36 percent of the park. Five fires burned into the park that year from adjacent public lands. The largest, the North Fork Fire, started from a discarded cigarette. It burned more than 410,000 acres.