• An aerial view of Old Faithful erupting taken from Observation Point with the Old Faithful Inn to the side.

    Yellowstone

    National Park ID,MT,WY

Celebrate the Start of Summer with Free Entry to Yellowstone

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Date: June 16, 2011
Contact: Al Nash, 307-344-2015

National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior

Yellowstone National Park
P.O. Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190
   
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 16,2011   11-064   
Al Nash (307) 344-2015

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YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK NEWS RELEASE
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Celebrate The Start Of Summer With Free Entry To Yellowstone

It seems like it has been a long time coming this year, but the official start of summer is just around the corner.

What better way to celebrate the day than by visiting the world’s first national park – for free!

The National Park Service is waiving entrance fees at all national parks on Tuesday, June 21. The entrance fee waiver does not include other fees such as those charged for camping, reservations, tours and use of concessions services.

A seven-day pass to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks is normally $25 for a private, non-commercial vehicle.

All park roads, lodging, and stores are open for the season, as are most of Yellowstone's campgrounds. Lodging and campground information is available at 307-344-2114; road information at 307-344-2117.

Since Yellowstone is a high elevation park, visitors are reminded to bring sunscreen to protect themselves during the day; and warm clothing for nighttime temperatures that can drop to near freezing.

Additional fee free days in 2011 are National Public Lands Day on Saturday, September 24, and the Veterans Day weekend, November 11-13.
 
- www.nps.gov/yell -

 

Did You Know?

Dog Hooked to Travois for Transporting Goods.

Some groups of Shoshone Indians, who adapted to a mountain existence, chose not to acquire the horse. These included the Sheep Eaters, or Tukudika, who used dogs to transport food, hides, and other provisions. The Sheep Eaters lived in many locations in Yellowstone.