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Bus Drivers Make First Court Appearance

Parrent and Stark
Jack Parrent, Jr., and Kevin Leon Stark

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News Release Date: June 6, 2011
Contact: Al Nash or Dan Hottle, (307) 344-2015

National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior

Yellowstone National Park
P.O. Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190
     
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 6, 2011     11-057      
Al Nash or Dan Hottle (307) 344-2015

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YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK NEWS RELEASE
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Bus Drivers Make First Court Appearance


Two bus drivers taken into custody Friday afternoon in Yellowstone National Park on suspicion of drunk driving made their initial court appearances Monday.

Jack Parrent, Jr., 44, and Kevin Leon Stark, 42, both of Bozeman, Montana, appeared Monday afternoon before U.S. Magistrate Judge Stephen Cole in the Yellowstone Justice Center in Mammoth Hot Springs, Wyoming.

Acting on a phone tip, park rangers contacted the pair Friday at the Specimen Ridge trailhead in the Lamar Valley east of Tower Junction, where the two buses the men were driving were parked.

Both were employed by Karst Stage of Bozeman, Montana. The firm had been hired by Bozeman Public Schools to provide transportation for a field trip by a group of middle school students.

When taken into custody, Parrent had a blood alcohol content of 0.091, Stark a blood alcohol content of 0.032.

Parrent and Stark each face three misdemeanor charges. Neither entered a plea during their federal court appearance Monday. Both men were released on a signature bond.

- www.nps.gov/yell -

Did You Know?

Dog Hooked to Travois for Transporting Goods.

Some groups of Shoshone Indians, who adapted to a mountain existence, chose not to acquire the horse. These included the Sheep Eaters, or Tukudika, who used dogs to transport food, hides, and other provisions. The Sheep Eaters lived in many locations in Yellowstone.