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Hayden Valley Hawk Watch Saturday, September 18

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Date: September 14, 2010
Contact: Al Nash , (307) 344-2015

National Park Service
U.S. Department of the Interior

Yellowstone National Park
P.O. Box 168
Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190
   
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 9, 2010 10-104
Al Nash (307) 344-2015

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YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK NEWS RELEASE
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Celebrate the spectacle of raptor (bird of prey) migration in Hayden Valley! Join Yellowstone interpretive ranger and raptor enthusiast Katy Duffy to watch and learn about raptors, their ecology and their migration strategies.

If you would like to learn some raptor identification tips, meet Ranger Duffy at 9 a.m. on Saturday, September 18, at the Fishing Bridge Visitor Center for a 45-minute presentation involving the mounted raptors on display in the visitor center.

Then join Ranger Duffy in Hayden Valley to observe and learn about the raptors that flow through Yellowstone National Park each fall. Meet at 11 a.m. at the turnout that is 6.6 miles south of Canyon Junction and 9 miles north of Fishing Bridge Junction. Each end of this turnout will have a sandwich board indicating that it’s the program location. Also look for a uniformed ranger with a spotting scope.

Observation of raptors will occur from 11 a.m. through 2 p.m.

Both programs are free and open to the public. Bring binoculars, water, and snacks.

For more information, please call Katy Duffy at 307-344-2754.

Did You Know?

Dog Hooked to Travois for Transporting Goods.

Some groups of Shoshone Indians, who adapted to a mountain existence, chose not to acquire the horse. These included the Sheep Eaters, or Tukudika, who used dogs to transport food, hides, and other provisions. The Sheep Eaters lived in many locations in Yellowstone.