• An aerial view of Old Faithful erupting taken from Observation Point with the Old Faithful Inn to the side.

    Yellowstone

    National Park ID,MT,WY

Three Small Fires Burning In Yellowstone's Backcountry

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Date: July 7, 2007
Contact: Al Nash, (307) 344-2010
Contact: Stacy Vallie, (307) 344-2012

Three Small Fires Burning In Yellowstone's Backcountry

Firefighters are working to contain three small fires burning in the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park.

The Raven Fire is burning about 9 miles east of Fishing Bridge, in an area of heavy old growth spruce and fir. Ten firefighters are working to keep it inside a perimeter bounded by a meadow and areas which burned in 1994 and 1988. The fire size is currently estimated at 20 acres.

Smokejumpers were dropped this morning on both the Elephant Fire and the Chicken Fire. The Chicken Fire is burning south of Yellowstone Lake, in 3 acre island of unburned trees entirely surrounded by the 1998 Huck Fire.  The Elephant Fire is burning about 4 miles due west of the Lake area. Smokejumpers have made good progress today containing the fires. Both are estimated at one-tenth of an acre. 

The three lightning-caused fires were discovered late Friday and are burning well away from roads and developed areas. None of them pose a threat to visitors. All visitor services, park entrances and park roads are open. 

Larger fires may produce smoke columns visible for several miles. Fire activity in the park and throughout the region the may result in temporary smoke accumulations over portions of the park, especially in the morning hours.

The fire danger in Yellowstone National Park has ranged from “Moderate” to “Very High” in recent days.  Fire restrictions have been in effect in the park since July 3. The weather forecast calls for partly cloudy skies, slightly cooler temperatures, and a chance of thunderstorms through Sunday.

There have been nine fires in Yellowstone so far this year. Four were caused by people, and five were the result of lightning strikes. 

Updated information on fire activity in Yellowstone National Park is posted the InciWeb Incident Information System web site at http://inciweb.org.

- www.nps.gov/yell -

 

Did You Know?

Dog Hooked to Travois for Transporting Goods.

Some groups of Shoshone Indians, who adapted to a mountain existence, chose not to acquire the horse. These included the Sheep Eaters, or Tukudika, who used dogs to transport food, hides, and other provisions. The Sheep Eaters lived in many locations in Yellowstone.