• A bull elk bugles in Yellowstone National Park

    Yellowstone

    National Park ID,MT,WY

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  • Craig Pass Closed for the Season

    The road linking West Thumb and Old Faithful is closed for the season—traffic should detour through West Thumb, Lake, and Canyon. More »

Our Staff & Offices

Learn About the People Who Manage Your Park
Within each national park, various offices manage budget and finance, concession operations, visitor protection, interpretation and education, facilities and infrastructure, and the protection and preservation of cultural and natural resources. Explore our offices for a better understanding of how the National Park Service manages Yellowstone.

 
Superintendent Dan Wenk

Superintendent Dan Wenk

NPS/Peaco

Office of the Superintendent
The Office of the Superintendent is located at park headquarters in Mammoth Hot Springs. This office has the ultimate responsibility for managing a 2.2-million-acre park with a staff of 800 National Park Service employees and a budget of $33 million, including cooperating with the surrounding communities where visitors from the park spend an estimated $333 million a year.

 
Employee using photocopier.

An employee copies documents for a meeting.

NPS/Peaco

Administration
This office supports park staff with day-to-day operations including recruitment, training, budget, telecommunications, and computers. They order and distribute supplies and services and receive and distribute mail (a whopping 140,000 pieces annually).

 
Snowcoaches leave the Mammoth Hotel.

Snowcoaches transport visitors to Old Faithful.

NPS/Peaco

Concessions
This office manages the businesses that provide food, lodging, and medical services, plus various permitted activities, such as boating, horseback riding, and guided tours. With 2,225 guest rooms, 28 food and beverage operations, 21 gift shops, 11 grocery stores, and 5 campgrounds, they stay very busy! More…

 
Plowing park roads.

A maintenance crew plows the road so it can open for the summer season.

NPS

Maintenance
This division oversees the monumental operation of maintaining campgrounds, buildings, grounds, roads, trails, and utilities. They are on the cutting edge of recycling efforts, pollution prevention, and waste reduction, while confronting unique challenges created by Yellowstone's remote location.

 
A ranger gestures while talking to visitors.

An education ranger describes geothermal activity in the geyser basin.

NPS

Resource Education and Youth Programs
Education rangers are the bridge between visitors and the park. These rangers staff the visitor centers and provide talks, walks, hikes, and campfire programs. They write and design roadside and indoor exhibits, publications, videos, and webpages, and engage with the public through social media. They connect young visitors through Junior Ranger and other youth programs.


 
A ranger at a entrance station passes a park entrance pass to a visitor.

Rangers staff the entrance stations.

NPS/Elhard

Resource and Visitor Protection
Yellowstone's law enforcement rangers provide safety and security for the park's visitors and its resources. They are in charge of emergency medical services, search and rescue, structural and wildland fire, and law enforcement. More…

 
A bear management specialist holds the radio collar dropped from a bear.

A bear management biologist holds a radio collar retrieved from the bottom of a pond.

NPS

Yellowstone Center for Resources
The YCR researches and monitors the resources at the heart of the nation's oldest park, including geology, fisheries, vegetation, fire ecology, and bear, bison, elk, and wolf management. The cultural staff research, monitor, protect, and restore archeological sites and historic structures, and operate the park's library and museum collections. More…

Did You Know?

Fire in Yellowstone Pineland in 1988

The 1988 fires affected 793,880 acres or 36 percent of the park. Five fires burned into the park that year from adjacent public lands. The largest, the North Fork Fire, started from a discarded cigarette. It burned more than 410,000 acres.