• An aerial view of Old Faithful erupting taken from Observation Point with the Old Faithful Inn to the side.

    Yellowstone

    National Park ID,MT,WY

Mammal References

These are important publications about this resource. The list may include academic publications, government publications, management documents that inform the decision-making process at parks and protected areas, or links to websites that provide additional information relevant to the topic.

Clark, T.W. et al., editors. 1999. Carnivores in Ecosystems: The Yellowstone experience. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Clark, T.W. and M.R. Stromberg. 1987. Mammals in Wyoming. Lawrence: University of Kansas.

Curlee, A.P. et al., eds. 2000. Greater Yellowstone predators: ecology and conservation in a changing landscape. Proceedings of the Third Biennial Conference on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Jackson, WY: Northern Rockies Conservation Coop.

Garrott, R. et al., editors. 2009. The ecology of large mammals in Central Yellowstone. San Diego: Academic Press.

Ruth, T. et al. 2003. Large carnivore response to recreational big-game hunting along the Yellowstone National Park and Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness boundary. Wildlife Society Bulletin. 31(4):1–12.

Schullery, P. and L. Whittlesey. 1999. Early wildlife history of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Report, available in Yellowstone Heritage and Research Center Library.

Streubel, D. 2002. Small mammals of the Yellowstone Ecosystem. Juneau, Alaska: Windy Ridge Publishing.

White, P.J. 2010. Yellowstone’s wildlife in transition: an assessment of ecological process management. YCR- 2010-08. Yellowstone National Park, Mammoth, Wyoming.

Did You Know?

Yellowstone Wolf.

There were no wolves in Yellowstone in 1994. The wolves that were reintroduced in 1995 and 1996 thrived and there are now over 300 of their descendents living in the Greater Yellowstone Area.