• A bull elk bugles in Yellowstone National Park

    Yellowstone

    National Park ID,MT,WY

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    Two sections of Yellowstone’s Grand Loop Road will be closed due to construction after the Labor Day holiday weekend. Travel between some points will involve long detours and significantly longer than normal travel times. More »

Bat References

These are important publications about this resource. The list may include academic publications, government publications, management documents that inform the decision-making process at parks and protected areas, or links to websites that provide additional information relevant to the topic. Click on highlighted links to access copies of the listed document.

 

Adams, R. A. 2003. Bats of the Rocky Mountain West: natural history, ecology, and conservation. Boulder, CO: University Press of Colorado.

Altringham, J.D. 1996. Bats: biology and behavior. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bogan, M.A., and K. Geluso. 1999. Bat roosts and historic structures on National Park Service lands in the Rocky Mountain Region. Final report submitted to the National Park Service, Denver, CO. USGS Midcontinent Ecological Science Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.

Fenton, M.B., and R.M.R. Barclay. 1980. Myotis lucifigus. Mammalian Species Publication No. 142. American Society of Mammalogists. 142:1–8.

Keinath, D.A. 2007. Yellowstone's world of bats: Taking inventory of Yellowstone's night life. Yellowstone Science 15(3):3–13. (1.3 MB pdf)

Did You Know?

Dog Hooked to Travois for Transporting Goods.

Some groups of Shoshone Indians, who adapted to a mountain existence, chose not to acquire the horse. These included the Sheep Eaters, or Tukudika, who used dogs to transport food, hides, and other provisions. The Sheep Eaters lived in many locations in Yellowstone.