Lesson Plan

Landscaping with Wind and Water

Picture of a Eagle Peak mountian againsts a blue sky

Eagle Peak

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Grade Level:
Fourth Grade-Eighth Grade
Subject:
Earth Science, Geology, Glaciers, Reading, Tectonics, Volcanoes
Duration:
1 hour
Group Size:
Up to 36 (6-12 breakout groups)
Setting:
outdoors
National/State Standards:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.10
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.7
Next Generation Science Standards: MS-ESS1-4., 2-ESS2-2., 4-ESS2-1., 5-ESS2-1., MS-ESS2-1., MS-ESS2-2.
Keywords:
earth science, erosion, geology, glaciers, reading, sedimentation, tectonics, uplift, volcanoes, weathering

Overview

Students demonstrate the destructive forces of erosion on small “mountains” and survey an area in the park, such as Lamar Valley, to identify evidences of erosion. Students interview a petrified tree in its natural setting to learn more about the changing landscape of Yellowstone.

Objective(s)

  • Demonstrate how wind, water, and ice are major agents of erosion.
  • Identify erosion caused by wind and water in Yellowstone National Park. 

Background

Landforms are created by constructive and destructive forces. In Yellowstone, constructive forces include uplift, volcanic eruptions, and sedimentation from inland seas and rivers. Destructive forces include weathering and erosion. Both types can change land forms dramatically.

 

Materials

Geologic event cards, erosion Investigation handout, plastic cups, plastic misting bottles, hand lenses, drinking straws, toothpicks, dirt, rocks, water, ice cubes, journals. 

Procedure

Park Connections

Erosion continues to shape the landscape of Yellowstone National Park. 

Additional Resources

Good, J.M.M., Kenneth L. Pierce (1997). Interpreting the Landscape: Recent and ongoing geology of Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks. Moose, Wyoming: Grand Teton Natural History Association.

Hendrix, Mark (2011). Geology Under Foot in Yellowstone. Missoula, MT: Mountain Press Publishing.

On the Scene of the Yellowstone Hotspot: Electronic Field Trip: http://www.windowsintowonderland.org/hotspots/index.shtml

Smith, Robert B., Lee J. Siegel (2000). Windows into the Earth: The geologic story of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Yellowstone Exposed: Mysteries in the Living Laboratory: Electronic Field Trip: http://www.windowsintowonderland.org/livinglab/index.html 

Vocabulary

pplift, volcanic, sedimentation, weathering, erosion