• The iconic first flight of the Wright brothers in their 1903 Wright Flyer

    Wright Brothers

    National Memorial North Carolina

FIRST FLIGHT SOCIETY DONATION HELPS FLIGHT RANGER PROGRAM TAKE-0FF

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Date: August 11, 2008
Contact: Outer Banks Group, 252-473-2111

Outer Banks Group Superintendent Michael B. Murray and First Flight Society President Bill Harris today announced a First Flight Society donation of $2000 to support the Wright Brothers National Memorial Flight Ranger Program.

By providing valuable educational opportunities like the Flight Ranger Program, the First Flight Society is helping the National Park Service to develop a legacy of stewardship for the Memorial through actively engage young people and their families in the history of the first flight and lessons learned from the Wright brothers; hard work, dedication and persistence.

"The Flight Ranger Program is a primary way that we reach out to visiting youth, "stated Murray. "This generous support will allow us to increase the number and types of activities we offer as well as increase the number of children participating in the program."

The Flight Ranger Program, offered year-round to children ages 5 – 13, has been in existence at Wright Brothers National Memorial for 15 years. Over 4000 children participate in the program annually, earning a Flight Ranger patch through completing workbook activities and attending ranger-led programs. For more information about the Flight Ranger Program contact Wright Brothers National Memorial at 252-441-7430.

The First Flight Society, one of aviation's oldest organizations, works towards memorializing the accomplishments of Wilbur and Orville Wright and promoting aviation in all its forms. For more information about the First Flight Society, go to www.firstflight.org.

The Flight Ranger Program is part of the National Park Service National Junior Ranger program, a youth education program series that engages children and their families in learning about the natural and cultural history found in each National Park. Since its creation in the early 1960’s, the Junior Ranger program has grown, now serving 362,000 children annually in more than 286 parks.

Although encouraged, children do not have to visit a National Park to become a Junior Ranger. To access the National Park Service WebRanger Program, go to www.nps.gov/webranger.

 

 

 

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