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    Women's Rights

    National Historical Park New York

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    Beginning on December 30, 2013 the park will be closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. The park will be open Wednesday-Sunday from 9 am to 5 pm

Women’s Rights National Historical Park to Host Lecture to Celebrate Native American History Month

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Date: November 5, 2013
Contact: Patrick Stenshorn, 315-568-0024

Seneca Falls, NY—Women's Rights National Historical Park will celebrate Native American History Month with a lecture by Dr. Thomas Lappas, Associate Professor of History at Nazareth College in Rochester, NY.

The lecture entitled "'For God and Home and Native Land': Haudenosaunee and the Woman's Christian Temperance Union" presents the work of two Onondaga women who formed branches of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union in Native American communities. The program will take place on Wednesday, November 20th at 6:00 pm in the park visitor center at 136 Fall Street, Seneca Falls, NY. Admission is free. 

"This program highlights the diversity of the nineteenth and early-twentieth century reform movements," said Chief of Interpretation and Education David Malone. "We are proud to be able to host this lecture here at the park."

Dr. Lappas holds a Ph. D in History from Indiana University. His teaching and research interests includeNative American History, American Colonial History, American Revolution, and France in North America 1530-1763.

For more information about programs at the park visitors are encouraged to call (315) 568-0024, or visit our website atwww.nps.gov/wori. You can also follow the park's social media sites on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/womensrightsnps) and Twitter (http://twitter.com/#!/WomensRightsNPS) to learn more about our upcoming programs. To request email announcements of all park programs, contact patrick_stenshorn@nps.gov orcall (315) 568-0024.

 

Did You Know?

Statues in the lobby of the visitor center

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