• First Wave Statue Exhibit

    Women's Rights

    National Historical Park New York

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  • Days of Operation

    Beginning on December 30, 2013 the park will be closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. The park will be open Wednesday-Sunday from 9 am to 5 pm

Curriculum Materials

Check out New York City's Department of Education Common Core Library. Search human rights to bring up lesson plans and units that will help you with the story of women's rights.

The Sewall-Belmony House has a new Teaching with Historic Places on-line Lesson Plan called A Woman's Place is in the Sewall-Belmont House: Alice Paul and Women's Rights.


Browse Our Curriculum Materials

Results

Showing results 1-10 of 11

  • Women's Rights National Historical Park

    Teaching with Historic Places: “Journey from Slavery to Statesman”: The Homes of Frederick Douglass

    Teaching with Historic Places: “Journey from Slavery to Statesman”: The Homes of Frederick Douglass

    Using Douglass’s own words, maps, and other primary sources, students will learn about the life of this great American hero. From the Eastern shore of Maryland as a slave, to New Bedford, Massachusetts as a freedom seeker, to Washington D.C. as an author, journalist, lecturer, and statesman.

  • Women's Rights National Historical Park

    Teaching with Historic Places: The M’Clintock House; A Home to the Women’s Rights Movement

    Teaching with Historic Places:  The M’Clintock House;  A Home to the Women’s Rights Movement

    This lesson plan will explore how the Quakers were interested in antislavery and women’s rights, and how the M’Clintock family lent their support to the Seneca Falls convention by providing experience in the planning and preparation for hosting conventions.

  • Women's Rights National Historical Park

    Catharine Blaine: Seneca Falls and the Women’s Rights Movement in Washington State (Elementary school level)

    Catharine Blaine:  Seneca Falls and the Women’s Rights Movement in Washington State (Elementary school level)

    This lesson plan examines the life of Catharine Paine Blaine, an attendee of the Seneca Falls Convention who traveled from Seneca Falls, New York to Washington Territory in the 1850s. Using everyday items that Catharine brought with her to the Pacific Northwest, your students will explore how eastern settlers brought both objects and ideas with them as they traveled. Students will examine primary sources and make connections to their own experiences.

  • Women's Rights National Historical Park

    Catharine Blaine: Seneca Falls and the Women’s Rights Movement in Washington State (middle school and high school level)

    Catharine Blaine:  Seneca Falls and the Women’s Rights Movement in Washington State (middle school and high school level)

    This lesson plan examines the life of Catharine Paine Blaine, an attendee of the Seneca Falls Convention who traveled from Seneca Falls, New York to Washington Territory in the 1850s. Using everyday items that Catharine brought with her to the Pacific Northwest, your students will explore how eastern settlers brought both objects and ideas with them as they traveled. Students will examine primary sources and make connections to their own experiences.

  • Women's Rights National Historical Park

    An American Story – The Jerry Rescue of 1851

    An American Story – The Jerry Rescue of 1851

    In 1850, Congress passed the Fugitive Slave Act, which said that all runaway slaves had to be returned to their masters, even if they had gained their freedom by escaping to a “free state”. On October 1st, 1851, an Abolitionist political party was holding an Anti-Slavery Convention in Syracuse, NY. That same day, a runaway slave named William “Jerry” Henry was arrested and jailed under the Fugitive Slave Law by federal marshals. If you were there, what would you do? What actually did happen?

  • Women's Rights National Historical Park

    Dress Reformers and Their Fight for Equality – 19th century Heroines

    Dress Reformers and Their Fight for Equality – 19th century Heroines

    In the mid-19th century, society expected women to wear long and heavy skirts and tight corsets. If they were cooking, carrying a baby, or working in a mill, this clothing could become dangerous. In the early 1850s, Elizabeth Smith Miller introduced a new clothing style that allowed freedom of movement and decreased hazards. Learn how this style of dress not only provided freedom of movement, but also became a symbol of women’s rights.

  • Women's Rights National Historical Park

    Oh No you Can’t: What Women in New York in 1848 Could NOT do in 1848

    Oh No you Can’t: What Women in New York in 1848 Could NOT do in 1848

    In the 1840s and 1850s, Women in New York State were restricted from many different activities. The Seneca Falls Convention was called to address many of these issues. Supporters of the women’s rights movement had previously worked in other reform movements, such as antislavery and temperance. The ideas and tools used in the women’s rights movement came directly from these earlier reform movements.

  • Women's Rights National Historical Park

    Lesson Plan to Accompany Video: Bad Romance: Woman’s Suffrage

    Lesson Plan to Accompany Video:  Bad Romance: Woman’s Suffrage

    The 19th amendment to the Constitution gave all women of legal age the right to vote. This lesson plan will explore the various means of non-violent protests used by Alice Paul and the National Women’s Party (NWP). It will address such ideas as the Silent Sentinels at the White House, and the imprisonment of suffragists for their protest activities. This lesson plan is an accompaniment to the video Bad Romance: Women’s Suffrage.

  • Women's Rights National Historical Park

    Scavenger Hunt for High School Students; Grades 9 – 12

    Scavenger Hunt for High School Students; Grades 9 – 12

    Help your class get the most out of the exhibits in our museum by using our scavenger hunt. This scavenger hunt will disburse your class throughout the museum and allow them to be inquisitive as they search for answers to questions about the First Women’s Rights Convention, the women’s rights movement, and the people who inspired and led the movement. Just download the scavenger hunt (in either PDF or MSWord format), print and distribute it to your students before you visit the park.

  • Women's Rights National Historical Park

    Scavenger Hunt for Middle School Students; Grades 5 – 8

    Scavenger Hunt for Middle School Students; Grades 5 – 8

    Help your class get the most out of the exhibits in our museum by using our scavenger hunt. This scavenger hunt will disburse your class throughout the museum and allow them to be inquisitive as they search for answers to questions about the First Women’s Rights Convention, the women’s rights movement, and the people who inspired and led the movement. Just download the scavenger hunt (in either PDF or MSWord format), print and distribute it to your students before you visit the park.

Did You Know?

Lucretia Mott

Did you know when the announcement for the First Women's Rights Convention was printed in the newspaper, Lucretia Mott was the only organizer named? More...