• Wind Cave National Park - Two Worlds

    Wind Cave

    National Park South Dakota

Wind Cave National Park Announces Positions for 2008 Summer Season

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Seasonal park guides offered a wide variety of interpretive programs.
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News Release Date: February 29, 2008
Contact: Tom Farrell, 605-745-4600

WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, S.D. - Wind Cave National Park is currently seeking applicants for a variety of positions for the 2008 summer season. While individual job application deadlines vary, most applications need to be received by March 15th. Limited housing exists for these positions and salary rates vary from $12.73 to $14.24 an hour. Most positions begin around Memorial Day and end in late August. Openings exist in the divisions of Interpretation and Fire Management.

 “This is an excellent opportunity to earn a good salary while gaining experience in a variety of disciplines,” said Superintendent Vidal Davila. “For example, the rangers hired to provide interpretive programs will learn the art of public speaking, developing and presenting public programs, proper money handling techniques, and customer service skills.”

Positions based primarily outdoors include working on the fence crew, which teaches some farm and ranch skills, and vegetative and animal biological technician jobs teaching plant and animal identification, database use, map reading, and land navigation.

Wind Cave National Park preserves and protects a complex three-dimensional maze cave system containing rare formations in its over 126 miles of surveyed cave. The park also protects 28,295 acres of mixed-grass prairie and ponderosa pine forest containing representative animal and plant species.

For more information, visit or call Wind Cave National Park at (605) 745-1126. Applications and a listing of available jobs are found on www.usajobs.opm.gov. Application information is also available at any One Stop Career Office.

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