• Wind Cave National Park - Two Worlds

    Wind Cave

    National Park South Dakota

Centennial Paleontology Site - Moving the Jacketed Fossils

Examining Fossil Teeth at the Mammoth Site

Examining Fossil Teeth at the Mammoth Site

Mammoth Site Photo

Examining the Fossils

The fossils are being examined at the Mammoth Site in Hot Springs. Their staff has years of experience examining the earth’s records of recent mammals such as mammoths, the short faced bear, and the recently discovered American lion.

 
Moving a Large Jacketed Fossil into a Litter

Moving a Large Jacketed Fossil into a Litter

NPS Photo by Tom Farrell

Fossils or Bones?

The records at the Mammoth Site are not fossils like the White River Group fossils found at Wind Cave National Park. They are still bones, but their treatment is much the same as fossils. The bones at the Mammoth Site are about 26,000 years old where the fossils found in the park are about 30 million years old.

 
Securing the Fossil in the Litter

Securing the Fossil in the Litter

NPS Photo by Tom Farrell

Lessons from a Lost World

These Wind Cave fossils reveal to us a past environment of the park. By protecting these fragile remnants, we can learn about a world that now only exists in fragments of fossils lying exposed on a South Dakota prairie.

Map of the Centennial Discovery

For more information about the Centennial Site click on the links below.

Discovery
Site Map
Rhinoceros Skeleton
Rhinoceros Skull
Mesohippus Skeleton
Excavating the Site in 2003
Excavating the Site in 2004
Jacketing Fossils
Jacketing Large Fossils
Moving the Jacketed Fossils
Centennial Paleontology Site Overview

Read the press release about the discovery.

 
Moving the Fossil Out of the Site

Moving the Fossil Out of the Site

NPS Photo by Tom Farrell

Did You Know?