• Wind Cave National Park - Two Worlds

    Wind Cave

    National Park South Dakota

Bibliography - Cave Biology

Anderson, John M. and Choate J.R.. 1989. Bats of Jewel Cave National Monument. Fort Hays State University, Department of Biology. 5 p.

Anderson, John. 1993. Bats of Jewel Cave National Monument, South Dakota. M.S. thesis, Fort Hays State University.

Ayre, Robert. 1962. Insects and Spiders of Caves of Colorado and South Dakota. National Speleological Society News 20(8): 102.

Bole, B. 1935. Myotis thysanodes in South Dakota. Journal of Mammalogy 16: 147-148.

Chelius, Marisa K. and Moore, John C. 2004. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of Archaea and Bacteria in Wind Cave, South Dakota. Geomicrobiology Journal 21: 123-134

Chelius, Marisa K. / Guy Beresford, Guy / Horton, Howard / Quirk, Meghan / Selby Greg / Simpson, Rodney T. / Rodney Horrocks, Rodney / and Moore, John C. 2009. Impacts of Alterations of Organic Inputs on the Bacterial Community within the sediments of Wind Cave, South Dakota, USA

Cryan, Paul M. 1997. Distribution and Roosting Habits of Bats in the Southern Black Hills, South Dakota. M.S. Thesis. The University of Mew Mexico. 98 p.

Duffy, Mary. 1997. Going to Bat for Habitat. Rapid City Journal, Sept. 20.

Jesser, Renee D. 1998. Effects of Productivity on Species Diversity and Trophic Structure of Detritus-Based Food Webs Within Sediments of Wind Cave, South Dakota. MA Thesis. University of Northern Colorado. 78 p.

Jones, J. Knox & Hugh Genoways. 1967. A New Subspecies of the Fringe Tailed Bat Myotis thysanodes, from the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. Journal of Mammalogy 48: 231-235.

Jones, J. Knox & Hugh Genoways. 1967. Annotated Checklist of Bats from South Dakota. Transactions of the Kansas Academic Society 70: 194-196.

Martin, R.A. & B.G. Hawks. 1972. Hibernating Bats of the Black Hills of South Dakota-Distribution and Habitat Selection. Proc. New Jersey Academy Science 17: 24-30.

Mattson, Todd & Cori Giannuzzi. 1994. Arrival and Departure of Hibernating Western Big-Eared Bats in Jewel Cave, South Dakota. Report submitted to Jewel Cave National Monument.

Mattson, Todd A. and Bogan, Michael A. 1993. Survey of Bats and Bat Roosts in the southern Black Hills in 1993. 15 p.

McCarty, J. Kenneth. Bats of Jewel Cave National Monument. 57+ p.

Moore, John C. / Saunders, Paul / Selby, Greg / Horton, Howard / Chelius, Marisa K. / Chapman, Amanda / Horrocks, Rodney D. 2005. The distribution and life history of Arrhopalites caecus (Tullberg): Order: Collembola, in Wind Cave, South Dakota, USA. Journal of Cave and Karst Studies 67(2): 110-119.

Moore, John. 1996. Survey of the Biota and Trophic Interactions within Wind Cave and Jewel Cave, South Dakota: Final Report. University of Northern Colorado.

Moore, John C., Clarke, Jennifer, Heimbrook, Margaret and Mackessy, Stephen. 1996. Survey of Biota and Trophic Interactions Within Wind Cave and Jewel Cave, South Dakota. Final Report 8/15/96.

Moore, John C., Clarke, Jennifer, Heimbrook, Margaret and Mackessy, Stephen. 1993. Survey of Biota and Trophic Interactions Within Wind Cave and Jewel Cave, South Dakota. Progress Report 11/29/93.

Mora, Dave. 1987. Bats of Jewel Cave. 30+ p.

Olson, Rick. 1977. The Hypogean Ecology of Jewel Cave National Monument, Custer County, South Dakota. MS Thesis. Unversity of Illinois. 96 p.

Peck, Stewart. 1960. A Faunal Survey of Wind Cave, South Dakota. National Speleological Society News 18(7): 71.

Tigner, J. 1992. Preliminary Report: Survey of Bat Roost Sites on the Nemo Ranger District, Black Hills, South Dakota. Unpublished report.

Walthall, G.E. 1962. Insects of Wind Cave National Park. 2 p.

Worthington, D.J. 1992. Methods and Results of a Census of Bats in Jewel Cave on December 16, 1992. Unpublished report to Jewel Cave National Monument, NPS: 3 p.

Worthington, D.J. Cave Entrance Modification and Potential Impact on Bat Populations at Jewel Cave National Monument, South Dakota: 14 p.

Did You Know?

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