• Wind Cave National Park - Two Worlds

    Wind Cave

    National Park South Dakota

Abstract - Preliminary Report on Potential Ground Water Within the Boundaries of Wind Cave National Park, Custer County, South Dakota

Gries, John Paul. 1959. Preliminary Report on Potential Ground Water Within the Boundaries of Wind Cave National Park, Custer County, South Dakota. 17 p.

Abstract

This preliminary survey of the ground water potential at Wind Cave National Park was undertaken at the request of Superintentent Earl M. Semingsen. Location, history, and performance of many of the springs within the park was secured from Mr. J. Estes Suter, Chief Ranger. The writer was accompanied in the field by Park Ranger Nathaniel R. Lacy.

A topographic base map of Wind Cave National Park (drawing No. WP-WC-5325) was available for rough plotting of all points of interest. These were later replotted in the field on the 7 1/2 minut quadrangle topographic sheets issued by the United States Geological Survey, to determine their distances from section lines and their approximate elevations. Wind Cave National Park covers parts of the Boland Ridge, Butcher Hill, Mt. Coolidge, Pringle and Wind Cave Quadrangles.

Genrealized geology is available from the Central Black Hills Folio 219, published by the United States Geological Survey in 1925. The writer also had access to high altitude aerial photographs flown by the United States Air Force in 1951.

Records of deep wells in the area are taken from the files of the Department of Geological Engineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, South Dakota.

Field work was completed, and the report written during June 1959.

Did You Know?

fire on the prairie

Fire is an important factor in protecting the prairie. Historically, fires burned across the prairie every 4 to 7 years. Fires burn the small trees that would otherwise march across the prairie and turn the grasslands to forest.