• Wind Cave National Park - Two Worlds

    Wind Cave

    National Park South Dakota

Abstract - Report of Study of Grassland Areas of Badlands National Monument, South Dakota; Fort Robinson Military Reservation in Nebraska; North and South Units of Theodore Roosevelt National Memorial Park, North Dakota; and Wind Cave National Park, SD

Albertson, F.W. 1953. Report of Study of Grassland Areas of Badlands National Monument, South Dakota; Fort Robinson Military Reservation in Nebraska; North and South Units of Theodore Roosevelt National Memorial Park, North Dakota; and Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota. Kansas State College, Hays, Kansas. 32 p.

Abstract

The purpose of study at Badlands National Monument were: (1) Concluding whether there are grassland areas within the Monument that are unique and sufficiently significant from a national interest viewpoint to warrent continued preservation in a national monument as well as to protect the foreground and background of the badlands wall and adjacent eroded slopes, and (2) Assessing the grasslands in the National Monument from the standpoint of their importance to the economy of the over-all local livestock industry. At Fort Robinson, the main objective was to conduct a study of grasslands in the Reservation to conclude whether the grasslands in this area or portions thereof are unique and sufficiently important to warrant preservation. The plan for study at Theodore Roosevelt Park and at Wind Cave Park was to make reconnaissance observations of grasslands in these areas and then compare the vegetation with the grassland types in the Badlands Monument to determine the general extent to which significant grass species in either or both of the parks duplicate those found in the national monument and, conversely, the extent to which significant grass species in Badlands National Monument are not found in Theodore Roosevelt National Park or Wind Cave National Park.

Did You Know?

Natural Entrance of Wind Cave

Winds caused by changes in barometric pressure are what give Wind Cave its name. These winds have been measured at the cave's walk-in entrance at over 70 mph. The winds at the natural entrance of the cave attracted the attention of Native Americans and early settlers.