• Wind Cave National Park - Two Worlds

    Wind Cave

    National Park South Dakota

Caving Narrative 1986 - September 22

Jim Pisarowicz looks into Calcite Lake

Jim Pisarowicz looks into Calcite Lake

NPS Photo by Karen Rosga

Participants:
Mary Laycock, Jim Pisarowicz, Darren Ressler, Karen Rosga

Duration of Trip:
12 hours

New Cave Surveyed:
200 feet

Since the initial explorations in the area around the lakes (early 1970s) there have been no survey trips into the deepest part of Wind Cave. Reviewing notes left by those earlier explorations, it was noted that many leads had been left unpushed.

Moving very quickly we made our way down to Calcite Lake in only 3 hours. Arriving about noon, we sat by the shore of the lake and ate lunch. Karen had brought a can of smoked oysters which everyone, save Mary, decided to try.

Making our way toward the Land of 10,000 Lakes I spied a small hole which I wormed my way through. This opened into a small room with false floors which had been bowed upward. Our survey began at this point.

Surveying through the small hole we headed south into another small room (25 feet by 25 feet). Mary was reading instruments and Karen had the lead tape. The first station into the room used Karen's thumb for the survey target. We named the room Thumbs Away.

A small crack to the south took us out of Thumbs Away into a third small room. Surveying out of the third room, the survey shots were very short (2-3 feet). Mary ended up positioned between Karen and I and complained about the smell of oysters. We called the room the Oyster Trap.

The Oyster Trap eventually opened up into a large passage where we connected onto another survey. There are still many leads in this area.

Report by: Jim Pisarowicz

Did You Know?

American bison on the Wind Cave National Park prairie

The American bison is the largest terrestrial mammal in North America. Male bison can weigh a ton and can run 35 miles per hour. Do not approach bison. They weigh more and can outrun you. More...