• Wind Cave National Park - Two Worlds

    Wind Cave

    National Park South Dakota

Caving Narrative 1985 - October 16

Phil Dodge looks at helectite bushes near Base Camp I

Phil Dodge looks at helectite bushes near Base Camp I

NPS Photo

Participants:
Jim Chisohm, Chris Gerow, Jim Pisarowicz, Fred Roberts

Duration of Trip:
6 hours

New Cave Surveyed:
181 feet

The purpose of this trip was to check high leads along the route to the lakes. Looking at the map of the cave it was noted that there were no middle or upper level passages in this area. We began at the Garden Gate by climbing into holes in the ceiling along this route. Several of these holes extended upward 30 to 50 feet or more but none lead to any significant passages.

Next we looked around the helictite bushes just north of Base Camp I and discovered that a small room previously just sketched onto the map was more extensive than indicated. Taking out the survey equipment we quickly mapped this room and associated passages.

After finishing this area we began checking leads again. As it seems common on such trips, just about the time we had to begin out we discovered lots of new passages.

Just before Base Camp I we all began pushing leads off to the east. Everywhere we turned there were passages that did not appear on our maps! Unfortunately we had to leave as we were supposed to be out of the cave by 5:00 PM. We will return to begin the survey of this new area of parallel joint passages in two weeks.

Report by: Jim Pisarowicz

Did You Know?

Natural Entrance of Wind Cave

Winds caused by changes in barometric pressure are what give Wind Cave its name. These winds have been measured at the cave's walk-in entrance at over 70 mph. The winds at the natural entrance of the cave attracted the attention of Native Americans and early settlers.