• Wind Cave National Park - Two Worlds

    Wind Cave

    National Park South Dakota

Caving Narrative 1986 - December 8

Karen Rosga by the shore of Evans Plunge

Karen Rosga by the shore of Evans Plunge

NPS Photo by Jim Pisarowicz

Participants:
Bob Kobza, Jim Pisarowicz, Karen Rosga

Duration of Trip:
12-1/2 hours

New Cave Surveyed:
none

The purpose of this trip to the Lakes area was to photograph the "new" lakes discovered in October, and to carry an inflatable raft to Windy City Lake. The raft will be used from now on to cross Windy City Lake instead of the time-consuming change into wetsuits and the swim.

On this journey we were really weighed down by all the equipment we carried: the rubber raft (stuffed into a somewhat large pack), photographic equipment (including 2 cameras, film, flash guns, tripod, and approximately 25 large flash bulbs), and of course, all the usual caving gear needed by 3 people for a trip of this length. Despite our heavy loads, we made it down to Windy City Lake in about 2-1/2 hours. Jim and Bob suited in wetsuits so they could pull Karen and all the equipment across the lake in the raft. Bob used his incredible lung power to inflate the raft, then we launched it, took a few photographs, and headed to the oppose shore and the "new" lakes beyond.

The actual photographing of the new area was a long process involving carefully coordinating flashes to fire at the same time, precariously balancing cameras on the tripod, and the frequent frustration of holding awkward poses for several minutes only to have the flash bulbs not work! But we managed to take a couple of rolls of film in about 5-1/2 hours, of which most pictures turned out.

After taking note of the water level on the gauge in Windy City Lake, we left the raft behind, packed up the wetsuits and other gear, and made our way back to the surface, arriving at about 11:30 pm.

Report by: Karen Rosga

Did You Know?

Bull Elk

Elk were the most widely distributed member of the deer family in North America and spread from the Atlantic to the Pacific, from Mexico to northern Alberta. Elk began to disappear in the eastern United States in the early 1800s. More...