• bible sitting next to a teapot

    Whitman Mission

    National Historic Site Washington

Living Arrangements - Fall 1847

The following is a list of who was living where in the fall of 1847. The names of those killed during the attack are in italics. The ages of the children and young adults are given in parentheses.

Main Mission House - Total 23

Dr. and Mrs. Marcus Whitman and their household consisting of the seven Sager children—John (17), Francis (15), Catherine (13), Elizabeth (10), Matilda (8), Louise (6), and Henrietta (4); five children of furtrappers— Mary Ann Bridger (11), Helen Mar Meek (10), David Malin (Cortez) (8), John (13) and Stephen (11) Manson; Eliza Spalding (10); and Andrew Rodgers (Adult). Also, Mr. and Mrs. Josiah Osborn and their children—Nancy A. (7 1/2), John L. (4), and Alexander (2); Crocket Bewley, and Lorinda Bewley (adults).

Emigrant House - Total 31

Judge and Mrs. L. W. Saunders and their children—Helen M. (14), Phoebe (10), Alfred (6), Nancy (4), and Mary A. (2); Mary Smith (15); Mrs. Rebecca Hays and her children—Henry Clay (4), and infant son, Rapolean; Mr. and Mrs. Peter D. Hall and their children—Gertrude (10), Mary C. (8), Ann E. (6), Rebecca (3), and Rachel (1); Mr. Nathan L. Kimball, Mrs. Kimball, and their children—Susan M. (16), Nathan, Jr. (12), Byron E. (8), Sarah S. (6), and Nina A. (1); Walter Marsh and his daughter, Mary E. (11), and grandson, Alba Lyman (2); Isaac Gilliland, Jacob Hoffmann, and Joseph Stanfield.

Blacksmith Shop - Total 8

Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Canfield and their children—Ellen (16), Oscar (9), Clarissa (7), Sylvia (5), and Albert (3); Amos Sales.

Sawmill Cabin - Total 11

Mr. and Mrs. Elam Young and their sons—James (24), Daniel (21), and John Q. (19); Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Smith and their children— Edwin (13), Charles (11), Nelson (6), and Mortimer (4).

In an Indian Lodge - Total 2

Two métis men: Nicholas Finley and Joe Lewis.

 

Sources

Drury, Clifford M. Chapter 21 (pdf 2.4 mb) of Marcus and Narcissa Whitman and the Opening of Old Oregon. 1994. Northwest Interpretive Association: Seattle, Washington.

Did You Know?

Brass compass which belonged to Dr. Whitman

In the fall of 1842 Dr. Whitman decided to travel from Waiilatpu to Boston. He wanted to convince the board members to keep his mission station open. Dr. Whitman was in such a hurry when he left that he forgot his compass.