• Whiskeytown Lake from the Davis Gulch Trail

    Whiskeytown

    National Recreation Area California

Lower Clear Creek Anadromous Fish Restoration and Management

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Date: July 25, 2008
Contact: Russ Weatherbee, 530-242-3442
Contact: Gary Diridoni, 230-224-2184

The National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management have released the Lower Clear Creek Anadromous Fish Restoration and Management Project Environmental Assessment for a 30-day public comment period. This project addresses potential restoration activities on federal lands that may occur over approximately a 10-year period along lower Clear Creek between Whiskeytown Dam and the confluence with the Sacramento River. These restoration activities are planned to improve habitat for native fish including the federally listed Sacramento River spring-run Chinook salmon and steelhead trout.

Potential actions discussed in this environmental assessment include multiple gravel augmentation projects, the placement of in-stream habitat structures, the operation of a temporary picket weir, and a potential floodplain modification project between NEED Camp and Peltier Bridge Campground.

Completed restoration activities along lower Clear Creek during the past decade, including the removal of the McCormick-Saeltzer Dam, flow augmentations, channel and floodplain restoration, and numerous gravel augmentation projects, have resulted in significant increases of salmon and steelhead populations within this stream.

Copies of this environmental assessment are available at the Redding Library, at the Whiskeytown National Recreation Area visitor center, and at the Redding BLM field office.

You may e-mail us your comments or send them to:

Russ Weatherbee

Gary Diridoni
Wildlife Biologist Wildlife Biologist
Whiskeytown NRA Bureau of Land Mgmt
14412 Kennedy Mem. Dr. 355 Hemsted Dr.
Whiskeytown, CA 96095 Redding, CA 96002

Go to Environmental Assessment (1.4 Mb PDF file)

Did You Know?

Phantom Orchid

Whiskeytown has phantom orchids (Cephalanthera austiniae)? They are all white and devoid chlorophyll. This means that it cannot make energy for itself and must rely on symbiotic mycorrhizae for its nutrition.