• From Right to Left: Weir House, Weir Studio, and Young Studio

    Weir Farm

    National Historic Site Connecticut

Letters

Weir Stories
Behind one families' personal letters are universal stories about life, love, art and friendship in America.
NPS
 

In an era of industrialization and urbanization, Julian Alden Weir and his fellow American Impressionists couldn't help but be fascinated by a small farm in Branchville, Connecticut. Admiring its open fields, historic stone walls, and intriguing light, they painted the dense landscape again and again. The following letters from Weir's time at the farm (1882-1919) help us understand why this landscape inspire not only Weir, but countless artists after him. They offer unique insight into the everyday life of the American artist, the challenges of being an American innovator, and the comforts of family, friends and home.

 

Work and Farm Life
Read letters describing life on a turn-of-the-century farm from the perspective of laborers and artists.

Download (91 KB - PDF)

 

Family and Friends
Weir's family members and friends frequently visited him at his farm. Read these letters to learn why.

Download (273 KB - PDF)

 

Art and Nature
Weir's time in the Connecticut landscape profoundly affected his views on art. Read these letters to learn more about Weir and his artistic philosophy.

Download (349 KB - PDF)

Did You Know?

Weir Studio - Photo by Peter Margonelli

Painter Julian Alden Weir wanted to build a rural retreat in the Keene Valley area of the Adirondacks, but decided instead that his farm in Branchville, Connecticut, now preserved as Weir Farm National Historic Site, would make a more suitable home for his family.