• From Right to Left: Weir House, Weir Studio, and Young Studio

    Weir Farm

    National Historic Site Connecticut

Paris - May 1902

Paris, May 6, 1902

John Ferguson Weir, while abroad in Europe, to his brother Julian Alden Weir:

I look forward to hearing of your going to Branchville and all that that implies. Don’t get too much involved in affairs—keep the paints and make that business the conspicuous first. I fancy you coming along the road with a six foot canvas over your back and the old fresh glow of enthusiasm over a good day’s work… No glories here equal—or quite equal the glory of a fine day at Branchville when we have come in for a fine dinner after good day’s work: that marks the high watermark of joy and happiness. Goodbye, old boy—I again look out the window to waft a zephyr toward you…

Did You Know?

Stars on the ceiling of Weir's studio - Photo by Barry McCormick

The Land of Nod was the name given to his property, now preserved as Weir Farm National Historic Site, by Julian Alden Weir and his artist friends. Both Weir and Childe Hassam used the phrase to title works that were inspired by the local landscape.