• Along the Washita - 1868 by Gene V. Dougherty

    Washita Battlefield

    National Historic Site Oklahoma

Washita Battlefield National Historic Site welcomes Doctor Paul Hutton

Dr. Paul W. Hutton visiting with guests.
Renowned historian and professor of history at the University of New Mexico visits with guests after they listened to his talk entitled Sheridan, Custer, and the Washita.
Park Photo

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News Release Date: November 7, 2009

Paul Hutton to speak at Washita Battlefield National Historic Site on Saturday, November 7, 2009

 

Dr. Paul W. Hutton, nationally renowned scholar and professor of history at the University of New Mexico, will speak at Washita Battlefield National Historic Site the evening of Saturday, November 7th.The program will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the National Park Service Visitor Center gallery one mile west of Cheyenne, Oklahoma. After the presentation, there will be a question and answer period. A reception and book signing will follow the program.

 

One of the nation’s most articulate and productive western historians, Dr. Hutton will speak on “Sheridan, Custer and the Washita,” with an emphasis on how the attack reflected the emerging military policy for the west. 

 

“We are looking forward to Dr. Hutton’s visit,” said park superintendent, Lisa Conard Frost, “he is an unparalleled historical commentator, dynamic speaker and long-time friend of Washita Battlefield National Historic Site.”

 

Dr. Hutton has written or edited many articles and books including Phil Sheridan and His Army, (1999) and was one of the historians interviewed for Destiny at Dawn: Loss and Victory on the Washita, the film produced for the park visitor center.

 

Did You Know?

Pre-dawn Attack

As Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer and his men rode towards Black Kettle's camp, they endured four days of blizzard conditions. Several troopers were affected by the inclement weather, including field surgeons, Henry Lippincott and William Renicke, both of whom were stricken with snow blindness.