• Along the Washita - 1868 by Gene V. Dougherty

    Washita Battlefield

    National Historic Site Oklahoma

Ken Burns' "The Dust Bowl" now available

the_dust_bowl_ken_burns
The Dust Bowl

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News Release Date: December 21, 2012
Contact: Hallie Milner, 580-497-2742

Washita Battlefield NHS is pleased to announce a new addition to the Western National Parks Association bookstore, "The Dust Bowl: A Film by Ken Burns."  This two-DVD documentary is a great resource for anyone interested in the Dust Bowl era or Oklahoma history.

  "The Dust Bowl" is a four-hour long, two-episode film that premiered on PBS last month. The movie was produced by documentary filmmaker Ken Burns. This film, according to Los Angeles Times television critic Robert Lloyd, "…is one of [Burns'] best works: more tightly focused than usual in time and place, with a clear shape, dramatic arcs and a conclusion that is at once cautionary and moving, topical and timeless."

 Burns interviews over two dozen survivors of that era to gain first-hand stories, which he integrates into the film, along with vivid photographs and rare video footage. The movie tells both what happened during the 1930s, and why. Not strictly about bygone years, the film is relevant to many of today's environmental concerns.

 "The memories of the Dust Bowl are still very vivid to many in Oklahoma and beyond who either experienced this natural catastrophe first-hand or were told stories by family members. This film is very important in preserving the history and telling these stories to future generations" said Superintendent Lisa Conard Frost. "It will resonate with many, especially those residing in western Oklahoma."

The bookstore, located in the park's Visitor Center, is open from 8 a.m.-5 p.m., seven days a week. The price is $24.99, and educators receive a 20% discount.

Did You Know?

Pre-dawn Attack

As Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer and his men rode towards Black Kettle's camp, they endured four days of blizzard conditions. Several troopers were affected by the inclement weather, including field surgeons, Henry Lippincott and William Renicke, both of whom were stricken with snow blindness.