• Along the Washita - 1868 by Gene V. Dougherty

    Washita Battlefield

    National Historic Site Oklahoma

Washita Battlefield NHS subject to Oklahoma firearms laws

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Date: February 24, 2010

Washita Battlefield NHS subject to Oklahoma firearms laws

A change in federal law, which became effective on Monday, February 22, 2010, allows people who can legally possess firearms under federal, state, and local law to possess those firearms at Washita Battlefield National Historic Site.

The new federal law makes possession of firearms in national parks also subject to the firearms laws of the state and communities where the parks are located.

“We have been working closely with local, state, and federal officials to ensure that we clearly understand the provisions of the laws that will now apply to our visitors when they are in the park,” said Superintendent Lisa Conard Frost. We encourage every visitor who may wish to bring firearms to the park to do their research ahead of time and ensure that they are aware of and abide by the laws that apply. Our goal is to provide safe, enjoyable park visits for everyone, and to preserve this very special place for people today and future generations.”

The new federal law has no effect on existing laws and regulations regarding the use of firearms in national parks or hunting. Hunting still is not allowed within the Washita Battlefield National Historic Site. Federal law continues to prohibit firearms in certain facilities, such as park visitor centers; these facilities are posted with appropriate notices at public entrances.

“For nearly 100 years, the mission of the National Park Service has been to protect and preserve the parks and to help all visitors enjoy them,” National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis said. “We will administer this law as we do all others-fairly and consistently.”                                               

Did You Know?

Doxey Shale

The distant hills north of Washita Battlefield are called the Horseshoe Hills. These hills were formed as a result of erosion of the softer surrounding material about 250 million years ago, leaving the harder Doxey Shale behind.