• Along the Washita - 1868 by Gene V. Dougherty

    Washita Battlefield

    National Historic Site Oklahoma

Native Garden

 
Washita Native Garden
Visitors take a moment to reflect at the Washita Native Garden.
NPS Photo
 

In the days before aspirin, drive-thru, and nylon fabric, people relied on the land for medicine, food, and clothing. They did not have a mega-mart to buy things; the land was their mega-mart. Animals and plants provided them with the necessary means for living. To most of us this sounds like an alien culture; using plants as clothing; forging tools from animal parts and trees; or chewing on bark to ease the tension of a pounding headache. But these were time worn traditions to the American Indians. This was their way of life.

In an effort to help the public understand these traditions Washita Battlefield National Historic Site partnered with the Cheyenne & Arapaho Tribes Language Program to develop the Washita Native Garden. This garden features 21 plant and tree species, all of which are significant to the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes for spiritual and practical uses. These uses are arranged into four separate categories: Daily Living, Home, Edible, and Medicinal. The garden itself is based on the design of the Medicine Wheel. This wheel holds spiritual and astrological significance to many American Indian tribes. It is used for healing rituals and as a source for peace and clarity.

In our efforts with the Cheyenne & Arapaho Tribes Language Program it is our hope to use this garden as a means to educate the public on the traditions of the past while providing them a peaceful place to contemplate the future.

 

 
Native Garden
Take a glance into the Cheyenne and Arapaho way of life. Learn about the plants of the Washita Native Garden. Which plant did Cheyenne use to help tan animal hides? Which plants healed the sick? Did any of these sacred plants hold duel purposes? Click on the picture to find out!
Interactive Native Garden Brochure created by Olivia Salmon

Did You Know?

Pre-dawn Attack

As Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer and his men rode towards Black Kettle's camp, they endured four days of blizzard conditions. Several troopers were affected by the inclement weather, including field surgeons, Henry Lippincott and William Renicke, both of whom were stricken with snow blindness.