• Trail of Tears artwork and trail walk

    Trail Of Tears

    National Historic Trail AL,AR,GA,IL,KY,MO,NC,OK,TN

Brochures

WALK IN THEIR FOOTSTEPS
The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail Official Map and Guide interprets the Trail of Tears events of 1838-1839, when the Cherokee Nation and four other southeastern tribes were removed from their homelands to Indian Territory (Oklahoma). Indian removal was an American act of opportunistic oppression and avarice. It is the story of tragedy and loss, but also of survival and remembering the past.

 
Official Map & Guide brochure 2012
Trail of Tears National Historic Trail Official Map & Guide
NPS
 

National Association of Interpretation first place 2013 winner for site publication:
The Official Map and Guide for the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail is available to download and print. Enjoy learning more about this national historic trail!

Front side (interpretive history and timeline) 2.38 MG pdf
Map side 2.01 MG pdf

There is also a high resolution Trail of Tears map under View Park Map under Park Tools on the left-hand navigation.

How to print the brochure using the "tile" option in your printer properties:

  • Choose File>Print.
  • In the Print window, look for "Page Handling."
  • In the drop down menu under "Page Handling," choose "Tile All Pages."
  • Choose "OK."

You can also request a brochure by mail: Contact Us

Download the text only trail brochure in large print. The brochure is formatted for ADA standards when printed at 11" x 17". To receive a printed copy e-mail us.

 

STATE BROCHURES

These brochures give in depth information on the Trail of Tears story in each state and offer more trail sites to visit.

For a Georgia (2.39 MG pdf) state brochure contact Jeff Bishop at wjeffbishop@yahoo.com

For a Tennessee (5 MG pdf) state brochure contact Amy Kostine at Amy.Kostine@mtsu.edu

 
GA_State_Brochure_ map side
Georgia brochure - map side
 

Did You Know?

Elkhorn Tavern at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, on the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail

President Andrew Jackson began to aggressively implement a broad policy of Indian removal in the 1830s. This policy, combined with the discovery of gold on Cherokee land in northern Georgia in 1828, led to their removal to Indian Territory (Oklahoma) on the Trail of Tears.