National Park Service

The Learning Place
Employee Training & Development Strategy

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Prepared by the Training and Development Task Force, National Park Service, December 1994. Updated by the Training and Development Community, National Park Service, December, 2001

Mission Statement
The NPS is committed to individual and organizational effectiveness in order to accomplish its strategic goals.

Training and Development is a catalyst for the NPS to engage in continuous learning, professional growth, and organizational effectiveness.

The professional Training and Development Community focuses on working with agency leaders to predict and develop strategies/approaches that conintue to a workforce capable of accomplishing NPS strategic goals.

Guiding Principles
Guiding Principles provide the context in which we accomplish our work.

1. Our actions support the NPS strategic plan and workforce challenge.
2. We serve the NPS workforce. We take direction from NPS leadership responsible for establishing strategic
direction for the bureau. We provide services to employees to enhance their capacity to respond to organizational needs.
3. We partner with Human Resources to produce a workforce capable of achieving the NPS strategic goals.
4. We create development opportunities with government partners and private organizations to increase our capabilities and performance.
5. We get better results for the NPS by working as an interdisciplinary multilevel team.

Strategic Goals

1. Develp a more flexible and capable T&D organization that is responsive to NPS leadership and strategic goals.
2. Build a competency-based, integrated system for managing employee performance.
3. Ensure all employees are grounded in the history and mission of the NPS and understand their contributions to our success.
4. Develop and implement a measurement system to monitor the effectiveness of what we do.
5. Develop an agile workforce that is capable of responding to changing organizational and personal needs.

Table of Contents
Mission Statement and Guiding Principles Introduction
The Strategy
Goals and Objectives
The Action Plan
Career Fields
Who Makes It Work
Training Centers
Financing the Strategy
Toward Implementation
Appendix A: The Training and Development Community
Appendix B: Training Centers
Appendix C: List of Occupational Series by Career Field
Appendix D: Work In Progress
Appendix E: Land Management Institute Proposal
Appendix F: Departmental Executive Leadership Program -A Proposal
Appendix G: Conservation Study Institute Proposal
Appendix H: Glossary
Appendix I: Task Force Membership

Introduction
The success of the National Park Service will require well-trained, effective employees. The goal of the employee training and development strategy described in this document is to put into place an enhanced training and development program that will enable all employees to effectively carry out the mission of the National Park Service. This will require a comprehensive training and development program that includes a redefined structure, a simpler and more accessible process for obtaining training, and expanded opportunities for all employees to develop their effectiveness in meeting the needs of their jobs.

The Mission Statement and the Guiding Principles place employees at the center of the training strategy. This strategy is easily summarized - deliver an effective training program for all employees, one that can benefit individuals as well as the National Park Service as a whole.

The NPS has long provided effective training, and training programs currently help employees do a better job. However, at the National Park Service's 75th Anniversary Symposium in Vail, Colorado, in October 1991, Symposium participants recognized, among other concerns, that shortcomings in the National Park Service's educational and training program could adversely affect the Service's ability to maintain its standards of professionalism. Accordingly, many Vail Symposium recommendations address training issues.

In the summer of 1994, Director Roger Kennedy distributed copies of a strategic plan for the immediate future, Creating Our Future: A Strategic Plan for the National Park Service, to all offices and field areas. This plan includes an "Action Agenda" for Fiscal Year 1995 that contains entries based on Vail Symposium recommendations which specifically target improvement and expansion of training programs.

A Training and Development Task Force was assembled in the spring of 1994 and prepared the strategy detailed here. It has moved forward with Vail Symposium recommendations and with the strategic plan's objectives and goals. It has created a specific strategy and a long-range plan for future National Park Service employee training and development activities. The task force developed many ideas and approaches not specifically mentioned in the Vail Symposium summaries or in the Director's strategic plan.

The key elements of the strategy are:


Six goals that are at the core of the augmented National Park Service Employee Training and Development Strategy, accompanied by an Action Plan. A set of career fields that identifies the jobs of all employees and that provides a foundation for the development of those employees' competencies. A Training Manager guides training and development for each career field.


An enhanced Training and Development Community that cooperates across all organizational levels in the development and delivery of the full range of training courses, alternative delivery methods, and techniques necessary to meet the educational goal expressed in the Mission Statement.


Training centers that make better use of existing National Park Service and cooperative facilities; vigorous pursuit of the creation of new facilities.


A funding program that helps employees by removing the long-standing concerns of supervisors and managers about how to pay for training. Individual parks and support offices will not have to pay for all of an employee's essential training. A significant portion of training will be paid by a national, centralized fund.


Cooperative partnerships that provide increased benefits.

Goals and Objectives


This strategy embraces many issues that fall into six categories: essential competencies, career development and professional growth, training opportunities, partnerships, monitoring and evaluation, and funding. In order to develop a set of goals and actions, these issues have been identified more fully. The first paragraph in each section below gives background on the topic. It is followed by a goal derived from the background paragraph and a list of actions required to achieve the goal.

Essential Competencies


Essential competencies and training needs have been established for some career fields but not for others. Career fields involving life safety and technical expertise such as law enforcement, fire management, architecture and engineering, some maintenance trades, and financial accountability require that the employee meet some standard or level of certification. Most career fields, however, do not have established essential competency standards.


Goal 1: Develop and deliver a comprehensive training program to address the identified essential competencies- knowledge, skills, abilities - for each career field.


Define the essential competencies necessary for each identified career field at the basic, intermediate, and advanced levels.


Conduct work force analyses to determine numbers and grades of employees and turnover rates in each occupational group.

Conduct training needs assessments to determine the specific developmental needs for each position.

Develop a comprehensive training program to address identified competencies for employees in all career fields.

Prioritize training programs and present the results to the National Leadership Council for approval and delivery.

Develop core curricula and methods of delivery.

Career Development and Professional Growth


The National Park Service has not consistently provided opportunities for the multidisciplinary training necessary to guide career and professional growth in all fields. Nor has it balanced the employee's need for professional growth with the organization's needs for skilled employees in particular fields.


Goal 2: Develop and sustain career development programs for all employees beyond and apart from essential competencies training.


Identify cross-training needs caused by reorganization activities. Develop programs and methods to meet those needs and begin delivery.

Develop a training program and an environment that will encourage mentoring as a developmental approach.

Support and promote existing advanced degree and certificate programs.

Delegate authority to field managers to approve attendance for, or fund, seminars, conferences, and professional meetings.

Establish a formalized process to obtain college credit and continuing education units for National Park Service or Cooperating Park Education Unit training.


Commit to a method of placement of participants upon completion of long-term developmental programs.


Offer re-orientation to all employees within the next two years.

Taking the essential competencies and curricula developed in Goal 1, define paths between occupations and career advancement within occupations.

Develop an interactive, computerized program to allow all employees access to career development information.

Provide training and career counseling to all employees.

Develop criteria to define the appropriate balance between organizational needs and professional growth.

Develop and implement benchmarks within each career field to provide incentives for continuous improvement within and beyond current occupations.

Training Opportunities


Rapidly developing technology is creating opportunities for expanded access to employee development programs. National Park Service employees and associated partners should have access to these materials.


Goal 3: Develop and distribute a comprehensive listing of training and development opportunities that include the best possible match between the competencies to be developed and the facilities, locations, methods, technologies, and strategies for delivery.


Survey leading public and private sector organizations for the best examples of training programs, methods, and technologies.


Evaluate and implement appropriate techniques and methods (formal classes, details, on-the-job training, and correspondence and computer-based courses) through which each competency can be developed.


Create and distribute a matrix that matches the essential competencies with the techniques, methods, programs, and activities most likely to aid in developing the competencies.


Revise and computerize training and development forms for ease of use and tracking.


Restructure the Training and Development Community to accomplish this strategy.


Implement a correspondence course unit.


Recognize task groups and working groups as training opportunities; advertise them as such, provide funding for participation, and formally acknowledge successful completion.


Using the data from the training needs assessments (Goal 1), develop courses, programs, and strategies to meet the needs.

Improve all physical facilities designated for training purposes.

Bring new training centers on line.

Partnerships


Park management relies on partnerships and joint problem-solving efforts that cut across park boundaries. Interagency training has been formalized Servicewide for law enforcement, fire management, and wilderness management. The extension of these efforts to incorporate such partnerships into a variety of other training and development programs is needed.


Goal 4: Expand training and developmental opportunities with governmental and private sector partners to facilitate an exchange of information and strategies.


Research, identify, and provide access to training resources at private organizations, state and local governments, other agencies, and universities that offer training opportunities.


Expand use of the Department of the Interior Learning Centers.


Obtain National Park Service concurrence to proceed with the Land Management Institute.


Plan and develop the Conservation Study Institute.

Participate with and support other agencies in management and delivery of interagency training.


Develop cooperative agreements with the Bureau of Land Management, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service, and other agencies for training and development.


Develop and begin implementation of an active training program on an international level that builds on the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) model.

Monitoring and Evaluation


Standardized course and curriculum evaluations are necessary to ensure that an identified competence is taught and/or the needed information disseminated. Systems are not yet in place that track and evaluate employee performance relative to participation in the training program.


Goal 5: Establish a process for validating training courses and developmental programs to assure that they result in the organizational and individual benefits for which they were developed. Review and refine process as needed.


Research what other organizations are doing in the field of evaluation, testing, and certification to develop a database of options.


Adopt or develop an evaluation method to determine whether a training course, program, or activity has produced the intended results: (a) that the trainee learned the essential competency for which the training was developed; and (b) that the organization received a return on the investment through improved employee performance and team work.


Identify the procedures for establishing and recognizing certification and benchmarks for specific competencies.

Funding


Currently, not all employees are assured access to essential career development and professional growth opportunities. Funding for National Park Service training and employee development has remained at about 1% of the overall National Park Service budget. This figure compares unfavorably with similar percentages for other land management agencies, and even less favorably with the 3% to 5% allocations at most major corporations. Over the past few years training has been funded through a combination of Servicewide, regional, benefitting park, and special-focus funds, resulting in disparities in training opportunities available to employees of particular career fields, regions, and parks.


Goal 6: Develop a funding program for training and development that achieves these goals and implements the action items.


Investigate and document all existing sources of funding and the use and distribution of those funds.


Use cost-effective delivery systems.


Centralize training funds into one Servicewide fund.


Assure that parks and central offices have a funded training and development program. Project-funded personnel will be provided with the support necessary to attend training and development programs.


Establish partnerships with other organizations to share in training resources, facilities, and funding.


Expand efforts to increase funding from outside sources.


Develop guidelines for National Park Service employees to present instruction to other agencies and institutions on a reimbursable basis.


Develop funding strategies and criteria for advanced degrees, certificate programs, and long-term developmental assignments. This will include funds for temporary replacement of employees.


Design and implement a tracking system to provide budget and other financial information for current and future expenditures.


Analyze funding distribution in terms of: (1) priorities (criteria), (2) mission orientation, and (3) return on investment.


Fully fund essential competency training from centralized training funds. Continue funding career development and professional growth training from a combination of centralized and benefiting account funds.


Increase Servicewide training funding to the level of 4% or 5% of the Operation of the National Park Service (ONPS) appropriation. Identify future funding needs based on full implementation of this strategy.


Offer National Park Service training and development products to other agencies and organizations on a fee-for-service basis.

 

The Action Plan


Meeting the goals described on the previous pages requires coordination of many tasks. This section summarizes the action items previously defined and lists them within a completion schedule framework. This schedule provides some immediate, tangible results and guarantees that the strategy is fully operational by 1998. The action items will be carried out, monitored, modified when necessary, and continued until the entire strategy is in place and functioning well. The strategy will evolve as actions are carried out and monitored.

Essential Competencies

Completed or operational during FY 1995

Define essential competencies for each of the fifteen career fields identified in this plan, as well as the Orientation and Mission program.

Conduct initial work force analysis.

Conduct initial training needs assessments.

Completed or operational during FY 1996

Develop a comprehensive training program.

Prioritize training programs and present the results to the National Leadership Council.

Develop core curricula and methods of delivery.

Career Development and Professional Growth

Completed or operational during FY 1995

Identify cross-training needs caused by reorganization, and develop and implement delivery programs.

Develop a training program to encourage mentoring as a developmental approach.

Support and promote advanced degree and certificate programs.

Delegate authority to field managers to approve attendance and funding for seminars and conferences.

Establish process to obtain college credit or continuing education units for training.

Commit to placement method for participants who have completed long-term developmental programs.

Completed or operational during FY 1996

Present re-orientation course to all employees.

Define paths between occupations and career advancement within occupations.

Develop interactive, computerized program for assessing career development information.

Provide training and career counseling to all employees.

Develop criteria to define the balance between organizational needs and professional growth.

Completed or operational during FY 1997 and beyond

Develop and implement benchmarks for each career field.

Return to the top

Training Opportunities

Completed or operational during FY 1995

Survey public and private sectors for the best examples of training programs, methods, and technologies.

Determine techniques and methods to provide essential competencies.

Create and distribute a matrix of training courses and methods.

Revise and computerize training and employee development forms and procedures.

Restructure the Training and Development Community to accomplish this strategy.

Implement a correspondence course unit.

Create a method to recognize participation in task groups as a developmental opportunity.

Completed or operational during FY 1996

Develop courses, programs, and strategies using data from the training needs assessments.

Completed or operational during FY 1997 and beyond

Improve all physical facilities designated for training purposes.

Bring new training centers on line.

Partnerships

Completed or operational during FY 1995

Identify private sector and other governmental institutions that provide training.

Expand use of Department of the Interior Learning Centers.

Obtain concurrence for the Land Management Institute.

Plan and develop the Conservation Study Institute.

Support other agencies in management and delivery of interagency training.

Completed or operational during FY 1996

Develop cooperative agreements with the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service, and other agencies.

Develop and implement training programs for international partnerships.

Monitoring and Evaluation

Completed or operational during FY 1995

Research what other organizations are doing in the field of evaluation, testing and certification to develop a database of options.

Completed or operational during FY 1996

Research and develop evaluation, testing, and certification methods.

Develop procedures for establishing certification benchmarks for specific competencies.

Funding

Completed or operational during FY 1995

Investigate, document, and analyze all existing sources of funding and their use and distribution.

Use cost-effective delivery systems.

Centralize training funds into one Servicewide fund.

Establish training and development funding targets for all park and central offices, including project-funded personnel.

Establish appropriate partnerships with other organizations.

Expand efforts to increase funding from outside sources.

Develop guidelines for assignments for National Park Service employees to instruct non-NPS participants.

Develop funding strategies and criteria for degree, certificate, and long-term development programs.

Design and implement tracking system to provide budget and other financial information.

Analyze funding distribution in terms of: (1) priorities (criteria), (2) mission orientation, and (3) return on investment.

Completed or operational during FY 1996

Fully fund essential competency training from centralized funds.

Completed or operational during FY 1997 and beyond

Increase training funding to a 4% or 5% level of the ONPS appropriation; identify future funding needs.

Offer National Park Service training and development products to other agencies and organizations for a fee.

 

Career Fields


Most park employees have been organized within a traditional division of labor: interpretation, visitor protection, resource management, maintenance, and administration. However, there has sometimes been confusion among job specializations - there have been specialties within specialties as well as general occupations that cross-cut or overlap several jobs. Too often there is confusion as to where one employee's job ends and another's begins. To correct this, the National Park Service now recognizes fifteen areas of professional expertise, referred to as career fields, that reflect its current needs and future directions.


A career field is a collection of occupations and tasks that require similar or related knowledge, skills, and abilities. Career fields are established to meet the varied training needs of a diverse work force. An employee will have access to the training necessary to acquire new skills or enhance existing performance. A Training Manager will be assigned to develop and deliver training in each specific career field and to assure a focused and consistent program. Several Training Managers may be located in the same Training Center. Courses will be offered in locations throughout the country regardless of Training Manager locations.


Each employee will have a copy of an organizational guide to assist in planning movement within a career field. This guide, or career ladder, will assist employees, supervisors, and training specialists with the professional development of all those in a career field. Career field descriptions and career ladders will be available to everyone, and will additionally help individuals understand what training is available throughout the National Park Service. It is significant that the strategy described in this document also provides opportunities for career development and professional growth apart from training in the essential competencies of one's career field.


The Orientation and Mission program area, while not a career field, will have a Training Manager and will provide the foundation to the successful career of all National Park Service employees.


Participation in training opportunities within these career fields will also be available to National Park Service partners. Appendix C lists the primary occupational series occurring within each career field. These fifteen career fields are summarized below.

Administration and Office Management Support


This multidisciplinary career field serves both non-clerical administrative personnel and the office support positions located throughout the service. Curricula will include a wide variety of administrative skills in budget and finance, acquisition, and property. Personnel courses will emphasize strategies for recruitment and retention of quality employees. The training manager recognizes that, as the workplace continues to change, secretarial positions will continue to change and will require increasingly complex skills.

Fire Management, Aviation, All Risk Management


Course offerings will address acquiring or enhancing proficiencies in the following areas, among others: incident command system (disaster preparedness and emergency operations), fire prevention and pre-suppression, structural and wildland fire management, and aviation management and use.

Historic Preservation Skills and Crafts


The built environment of the National Park Service contains a significant number of historic properties that require specialized techniques for preservation and maintenance.


Programmatic areas include courses in preservation techniques, preservation philosophy, and application of historic crafts and materials, as well as long-term programs such as the two-year Preservation and Skills Training (PAST) program. This career field is closely linked to the Maintenance career field.

Information Management


This is a multidisciplinary career field with curricula addressing several programmatic areas:


Office Automation and Systems Support. Support services include data processing, word processing, and telecommunications specialists located in the Washington Office. Field and System offices focus on proficiency enhancement, the introduction of new technologies, network support, software development, and maintenance of skills.


Resource-Related Computer Systems. Systems include Geographic Information System (GIS), Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CADD), and Visual Simulation. Topics include system design and applications for research, resources management, planning, design, maintenance and preservation activities; development and transfer of new technologies; proficiency enhancement; and maintenance of skills and abilities.


Technical Information Storage and Retrieval. Internet, electronic mail, Library and Archive systems, among others, are an important part of the Information Management curriculum.

Interpretation, Education, and Cooperating Associations

 

 


Components of this career field include methods and techniques for delivering traditional interpretive programs in parks; development of curricula integrating park themes in local educational programs; integration of interpretive planning techniques in Servicewide operational activities; quality design; and marketing techniques for cooperating associations. Multiple series will access this field.

Law Enforcement and Resource Protection


Law Enforcement and Resource Protection is a primary function of employees assigned to Visitor Management and Resource Protection. Curricula will address proficiencies that include federal law and regulations, arson investigations, human relations, patrol operation, resource protection, communications, and criminal investigation.

Maintenance  

 

 


This career field is multidisciplinary, covering over 80 classification series in all technical trades and crafts (Wage Board positions) as well as technical programs for associated professionals (e.g., facility managers). It includes standard maintenance programs; apprenticeship programs; introductory, intermediate, and advanced vocational training courses; certification, recertification, and craft and professional licensing programs; and development of specialty maintenance programs.

Risk Management (Occupational Health and Safety


Compliance with health and safety regulations is the overall responsibility of all employees. Programmatic responsibilities for specialists include: life-safety and Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) regulations; hazardous materials and waste liability; inspections and evaluations of employee, contractor, concessioner, and visitor facilities; and accident and Office of Workers Compensation Program (OWCP) claims.

Organizational Development


This interdisciplinary career field includes employees with responsibilities in organizational and employee development, training and instruction, education, and equal opportunity. Courses and other developmental activities focus on building capabilities for increasing healthy relationships and processes in an organization, helping groups initiate and manage change and ongoing improvement, empowering all employees to provide quality customer service, and assuring equity in human resources management activities. Specialists working in organizational development may have backgrounds in a variety of career fields.

Planning, Design, and Construction


This career field is both interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, and it covers several programmatic areas. Course offerings that apply to all areas include Sustainable Practices, Team Captain Training, and Management of Park Development Projects.


Planning and Facility Development Support. Topics include applied research, environmental assessment, impact analysis, public involvement, and partnerships in all types of National Park Service areas under study.


Design and Construction. Technical courses cover site and structural specifics, including regulatory requirements and licensing provisions.


Technical Support to Planning, Design, and Construction. Specific training courses relate to planning, design, and construction activities for disciplines not covered above.

Recreation and Conservation Programs


There is great diversity in the proficiencies and requirements for employees who work primarily in technical assistance programs external to the Operations of the National Park System (ONPS) functions. These external programs include Rivers and Trails and Conservation Assistance, National Heritage Area Assistance, Heritage Education and Outreach Assistance, Long-Distance Trails Studies, Preservation Tax Incentives, State Program Review, National Register of Historic Places, Historic American Building Survey and Historic American Engineering Record, Grants Administration, Land and Water Conservation Fund, Urban Parks and Recreation Recovery Act, Historic Preservation Fund, Surplus Property Transfer and Monitoring, National Landmarks, and Archeological Public Education and Outreach. This career field provides a linkage between specific professional programs offered in the Resources Stewardship and the Planning, Design, and Construction career fields.

Resource Stewardship


This interdisciplinary career field has two separate programmatic areas, each requiring a Training Manager. The principal occupational series are listed in Appendix C; however, employees throughout the Service should be able to access course offerings in Resources Stewardship as appropriate for enhanced job performance.


Natural Resources. This program focuses on the tools necessary to protect and maintain natural resources; techniques for resource identification, evaluation, and monitoring; maintenance or restoration of native ecosystems; strategies to integrate research into management and education activities; general ecosystem management; resources data management; and compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and other environmental law and policy, the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and similar regulations.


Cultural Resources. The focus in this area is on the tools and techniques necessary for appropriate planning, preservation, interpretation, protection, and maintenance of an extensive and diverse collection of cultural resources. Course offerings will address issues in anthropology, archeology, cultural landscapes, curation, ethnography, historical architecture, and history; computer applications for cultural resources management (CRM); CRM policy and philosophy; strategies in cultural resources planning; management of cultural sites; and compliance with preservation law and policy, NEPA, and similar regulations.

Specialty Fields


National Park Service employees fill a wide variety of occupational series. Most training needs can be met through one or more of the career fields elaborated; however, it is recognized that some occupations do not lend themselves to an easily identifiable niche. This career field will specifically address the development and delivery of such courses as may be required for existing or emerging career fields not covered elsewhere.

Supervision, Management, and Leadership


This interdisciplinary career field includes the crucial responsibility of directing and guiding the work of others in achieving unit and organizational supervision and management. Curricula include such diverse components as work planning, counseling and appraisal, communication, leadership, equal opportunity policy and regulation, problem solving, and working with communities. Leadership curricula include instruction and development opportunities to expand employees' abilities to visualize self and group potential, create environments that increase personal and organizational abilities, and work effectively in teams.

Visitor Use Management


Visitor Use activities are multidisciplinary. Specific job responsibilities may require proficiency in such areas as fee collection management, special park use and recreation use management, Emergency Medical Services (EMS), search and rescue, agency agreements, backcountry and wilderness management, accessibility management, and application of sociologic and economic data to park situations.

 

Who Makes It Work


The National Park Service will provide training and other developmental opportunities to meet identified needs through a Servicewide delivery system. Parks and other units will receive support from identified training and development personnel assigned to central offices and training centers. Funding for training in essential competencies in the various career fields will be equitably distributed throughout the Service.


It takes many specialists and support staff members to prepare and deliver a comprehensive, quality training program to the employees of an organization as large and diverse as the National Park Service. Field offices and training centers include employee development specialists without whom there would be no organized training.


Effective training and development occur when the components of the Training and Development Community are working together at all levels of the System, from field area employees to the highest levels of National Park Service leadership. Especially crucial are the relationships between employees and supervisors and their relationships to the rest of the Training and Development Community. This plan can succeed only with their direct involvement and cooperation.


The employee is the focus for the implementation of the National Park Service mission. Individual employees use the National Park Service Training and Development Program to enhance their competencies and professional growth in order to meet this mission.


The supervisor provides the central support and guidance to employees in developing their competencies to meet the work team's goals and help fulfill the mission of the National Park Service. The supervisor helps the employee balance personal goals and development needs with the needs of the work team and the organization, and assures that the employee's competencies remain current.


Effective training, therefore, begins at the grass-roots level. A crucial factor in the National Park Service training strategy is the employee-supervisor relationship. Employees must take an active role in their own development while consulting with their supervisors on training matters. Supervisors are responsible for assisting employees, both as individuals and as teams, with their professional development. A strong employee- supervisor relationship in matters of training and development will ensure the success of the strategy. Similarly, supervisors are responsible for assisting with the development of a competent work force by communicating their employees' needs to managers. The first two guiding principles at the front of this document summarize these points.


The manager is the key to program evaluation and system accountability. Management assures that employees and supervisors are being trained to meet the current and future needs of the National Park Service.


The National Leadership Council provides the National Park Service with the resources and overall direction required to carry out a sustained, effective training program. The National Leadership Council consists of the Director, the Deputy Director, Associate Directors, and the Field Directors. Communication between the National Leadership Council and National Park Service managers throughout the country will help the National Park Service achieve its training goals and thereby assist in carrying out its mandates.


Seventeen Training Managers are responsible for the development, delivery, monitoring, and modification of programs that provide employees with the essentials of their job skills, referred to in this report as essential competencies. The Training Managers are supported by Training Officers and others in parks and offices, the Training Centers, and other specialized educational institutions. An enhanced Training and Development Community cooperates across all organizational levels in the development and delivery of the full range of training courses, and in the creation of the alternative delivery methods and techniques necessary to meet the educational goal expressed in the Mission Statement.


The components of the Training and Development Community are outlined below. This community begins at the park level. Appendix A consists of an expanded list of the members of the Training and Development Community, identifying specific roles, responsibilities, and relationships for each component. This strategy is designed to be flexible. Accordingly, each central office manager will need to select from the positions noted below in designing a training and development component that suits the needs of the resources being managed. There is no single formula that will work in all situations.

Park or Unit Employee

Supervisor

Manager

Park Training Team (Full-time or Collateral)

Central Office Organizational Development Specialist

Training and Development Officer

Employee Development Specialist or Assistant

Career Counselor

Training Center Training Center Superintendent

Training Manager, Training Specialist

Employee Development Specialist or Assistant

Washington Office Training and Development Program, Team Leader


Organization Development Specialist

Employee Development Specialist

National Leadership Council

The Washington Office Directorate and Field DirectorsTraining Centers


The National Park Service operates training facilities that provide a broad spectrum of programs. Two of these, the Albright and the Mather Training Centers, are comprehensive facilities that have long served many purposes and have provided nearly the full range of developmental opportunities traditionally promoted by the Service. Other Service facilities, such as the Williamsport Preservation Training Center, are newer and meet specialized needs.


The Vail Symposium recommendations and the Director's strategic plan action items stress the need for the National Park Service to join with others in sharing information, talent, techniques, and resources in all aspects of resource conservation and land management activities. The development and execution of training programs have been and will continue to be the focus of nearly all cooperative partnerships into which the National Park Service has entered or will seek to enter.


The National Park Service has also formed alliances with several federal departments and bureaus to meet training needs in shared activities. The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center and the National Interagency Fire Center are examples that demonstrate that the National Park Service has much to gain by developing further cooperative partnerships with agencies, organizations, universities, and other groups that have expertise and that share the goals of the National Park Service.


Training Managers are located at training centers and are responsible for coordinating the overall training and development program for a particular career field. Partners of the National Park Service may also participate in these training activities.


Some of the training centers described below are operated by the National Park Service, while others are cooperative facilities through which the National Park Service is able to conduct many of its training and development programs. Opportunities have emerged to establish new training centers, including the Presidio, the Denver Training Center, the Capital Training Center, and the Conservation Study Institute. Similarly, National Park Service employees will soon have greater opportunities for specialized training at the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training.


Ten existing and proposed training centers are part of the national training strategy and make up the Training and Development Program. Appendix B consists of an expanded list of these centers that identifies their specific roles and functions.

Existing Training Centers

Horace M. Albright Training Center


The role of the Horace M. Albright Training Center is to train and educate National Park Service employees in National Park Service Orientation and Mission. It is located at the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The Albright Training Center coordinates a comprehensive training and development program for the following career support function:

National Center for Preservation Technology and Training


The role of the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training is to facilitate research and training in Preservation and Conservation Technology. The Preservation Center provides training and grants to facilitate research for state, local, and private organizations, and for National Park Service employees. The Center works closely with the Washington Office Cultural Resources Stewardship function, academic institutions, Federal laboratories, non-profit preservation and conservation organizations, local governments, individual professionals in the field of preservation and conservation, National Park Service units, and other agencies and organizations. It is located at Northwestern State University, Natchitoches, Louisiana.

National Interagency Fire Center at Boise


One of several roles of the National Park Service component of the National Interagency Fire Center at Boise (NIFC) is to train and develop National Park Service employees in Fire Management, Aviation, and All Risk Management. NIFC currently works in partnership with the Ranger Activities Division and the Bureau of Land Management (host agency). The National Park Service unit shares in the primary purpose of NIFC, working in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service, the National Weather Service, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Office of Aircraft Services, and other agencies and organizations. NIFC is located at the National Interagency Fire Center at Boise, Idaho.

National Park Service Law Enforcement Training

Federal Law Enforcement Training Center: The role of the National Park Service Law Enforcement Training Center at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (NPS-FLETC) is to train and develop National Park Service employees in Law Enforcement and Resource Protection. NPS-FLETC currently works in partnership with the Ranger Activities Division; the U.S. Department of Treasury (host agency); approved SLETP colleges and universities; and other agencies and organizations. The National Park Service unit acts as the on-site Agency Representative for the Tennessee Valley Authority in all law enforcement training issues at FLETC. NPS-FLETC is located at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia, in conjunction with over seventy cooperating agencies.

United States Park Police Training Branch: The role of the United States Park Police Training Branch is to train and develop U.S. Park Police officers in law enforcement and visitor protection. The U.S. Park Police Training Branch works in partnership with the Planning Branch of the Operations Division and the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center. It works closely with the NPS National Capital Region, the Washington Area Council of Governments, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the American Society of Law Enforcement Trainers, the F.B.I. National Academy, and state and local agencies in and around our areas of jurisdiction. The U.S. Park Police Training Branch is located at the Anacostia Operations Facility in Washington, D.C., and FLETC in Glynco, Georgia.

Stephen T. Mather Training Center


The role of the Stephen T. Mather Training Center is to train and develop National Park Service employees in Interpretation, Education, and Cooperating Associations; Visitor Use Management; and Administration and Office Management Support. Mather is located on the historic Storer College campus, a part of the Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry, West Virginia.

Williamsport Preservation Training Center


The role of the Williamsport Preservation Training Center is to support preservation and maintenance of historic properties in the National Park Service by providing a comprehensive program of preservation education and employee development in Historic Preservation Skills and Crafts. It is presently a unit of the Harpers Ferry Center, but will become part of the Training and Development Program in the Washington Office. The Williamsport Preservation Training Center is currently located in buildings belonging to the C&O Canal National Historical Park in Williamsport, Maryland. It is scheduled to relocate to buildings at the Monocacy National Battlefield near Frederick, Maryland.

Proposed Training Centers

Conservation Study Institute

The role of the Conservation Study Institute is to educate and train National Park Service employees and the wider Park Service community in the history of Conservation and in the application of cooperative conservation, and to provide a forum for the examination and discussion of conservation perspectives. The Institute will be aligned with an academic institution and other cooperative partners. It will work in association with the Marsh-Billings National Historical Park in Woodstock, Vermont.

 

Denver Training Center


The Denver Training Center will train and develop National Park Service employees in Planning, Design, and Construction; and Occupational Health and Safety. It will be associated with the Denver Service Center and other training facilities located in Denver, Colorado.

Presidio Training Center


The role of the future Presidio Training Center will be to train and develop National Park Service employees in Maintenance; Resources Stewardship (Cultural Resource Stewardship and Natural Resource Stewardship); and Supervision, Management, and Leadership. The Presidio will train international park personnel in the management of park resources throughout the world, and it will manage the Center for Resources Management Leadership, the National Park Service Correspondence School Unit, and the National Park Service Training Audiovisual Unit. It will be located at Fort Scott within the boundaries of Golden Gate National Recreation Area, San Francisco, California.

Capital Training Center


The role of the Capital Training Center will be to train and develop National Park Service employees in Recreation and Conservation Programs, Information Management, Specialty Fields, and Organizational Development. It will be located in Washington, D.C.

Financing the Strategy


The National Park Servicespends approximately 1.5% of ONPS funds at all levels of the organization on the training and development of its permanent and seasonal employees. This strategy proposes that the funding levels be dramatically increased in order to achieve the mission and goals of the organization.


The training and development strategy for 1995 will develop detailed implementation plans through the work of nineteen separate work groups (Appendix D). The result of this comprehensive work in progress will be brought before the National Leadership Council in November of 1995 for approval. If approved, full implementation will begin in 1996.


While this planning continues, one focus for the 1995 training and development program will be a strong emphasis on assuring complete mission and orientation training for all employees. Another focus will be to update the skills of supervisors and managers in dealing with the dynamics of our changing organization.


The Director will issue a memorandum advising the Service that effective January 1, 1995, all training and development for Fiscal Year 1995 will be placed on hold and all efforts redirected toward implementing this strategy. The memorandum will also direct the Training and Development Division to identify all current sources of funding and to redirect those sources in support of the aforementioned purposes. Mandated training will also be provided in 1995 where a valid need must be met. The funds will be placed in a centralized account for Servicewide use.


One of the key proposals made in this strategy is to diversify the kinds of training and to deliver more of it at a local level to reduce costs. This has led to the identification and preliminary costing-out of various types of training units. These are described below.

Training Units

Formal Training Unit (FTU) = $1,500.00


1 Employee at a 40-hour training course at a Training Center.


(includes travel, per diem, and course costs)

Correspondence TU (CTU) = $300.00


1 Employee receiving a 40-hour training course at their work station.


(includes kit, postage, phone support, and administration of course)

Satellite TU (STU) = $700.00


1 Employee receiving a 40-hour training course at their work station, or in a classroom setting with an on-site facilitator.


(includes equipment cost, up and down link costs, facilitator, and course package)

Resource TU (RTU) = $100.00


1 Employee receiving a 40-hour training course at their park or office, in a classroom setting, using a Training Center facilitator and training materials.


(includes travel & per diem for Training Center facilitator and materials)

Video TU (VTU) = $50.00


1 Employee receiving 4 hours of reinforcement training or a national policy message by video tape at their home unit.


(includes production and distribution of tape to target audience)

Purchased TU (PTU) = $2,500.00


1 Employee receiving 40 hours of training from a contractor or other provider of training.


1 Employee receiving an advanced degree would equal 4 PTUs.


1 Employee receiving an advanced technical certificate would equal 2 PTUs.


At 3% of ONPS, this diversification of the training program would allow all employees to receive two training units each year.

Proposed Funding Schedule


With these needs in mind, it is proposed to fund this program in the following way:


Fiscal Year 1995 - A central training account of $7,000,000 is established for use in implementing the transitional Calendar Year 1995 training program. This account will consist of existing Washington Office (WASO) training dollars, all funding identified for training and held in WASO accounts, and $500,000 to $750,000 of reprogrammed funds.


Fiscal Year 1996 - The central account is proposed to increase to $10,000,000 through appropriations.


Fiscal Years 1997 through 2000 - The central account is proposed to increase by one-half percent each year through appropriations until the 3% level is achieved.


In addition to the above, regional offices and parks will continue to have funding available for training and development with a recommended minimum level of 1% each in Fiscal Years 1995 through 1997. This level can be reduced to a minimum of one-half percent in each regional office and park beginning in Fiscal Year 1998, based on the increased level of funding proposed to be available within the central fund.


The National Leadership Council is fully committed to the implementation of this strategy. Every effort will be made to achieve funding increases for training and development through appropriations; but should that effort fail, the strategy will still go forward.

 

Toward Implementation


This document describes an enhanced training and employee development program and strategy for all National Park Service employees including permanent, seasonal, and volunteer staff members. It identifies structure, goals, priorities, methods, and funding.


The National Park Service is committed to protecting the resources, serving the visitors, and supporting the work force. The work force is responsible for managing the balance between resource protection and visitor use. This strategy moves the organization toward accountability for developing and training all National Park Service employees to protect and more effectively manage resources. It also reflects the organization's commitment to the broader community of individuals, groups, organizations, and agencies with which the National Park Service shares a conservation mission.


The National Park Service leadership fully supports the proposal outlined in this report. It recognizes that training and employee development are investments in the organization and in its employees that produce tangible and measurable results. This strategy changes as the needs of employees and the resources shift. Further details and curriculum specifics will be developed within the next year. Implementation of the strategy begins now.

Resolutions


The Directorate has made several resolutions that are necessary to implement this strategy. These resolutions reflect their strong commitment to the growth and development of all National Park Service employees.


_ The National Leadership Council, consisting of the Washington Office Directorate and the Field Directorates, will oversee the training and development program, which is being implemented as a national strategy and system.


_ All career fields will have career ladders, and training needs will be identified from entry- level to high-level leadership positions. All training given in support of an employee's essential competencies will be paid for by the national program and not by benefitting accounts.


_ Funds and Full Time Equivalencies (FTE) used in this program will be centralized in the Training and Development Division and managed accordingly, based upon the competencies and skills needed to accomplish the mission. Funding will still be available in parks and Field Directorate offices.


_ Servicewide training manager positions will be established to develop and deliver training in each career field identified in this strategy. An enhanced delivery system will allow a variety of locations and new methods.


_ Employees and supervisors will receive more training and employee development services at the local level.


_ The National Park Service Training and Development Community will be restructured and training facilities improved to support the development and delivery of all training.


_ A team consisting of the Training and Development Division, Training and Development Officers, Training Managers, and Training Center Superintendents will develop the annual training program and budget based on a Servicewide needs assessment. The National Leadership Council will approve the program.


_ Testing, evaluation, and accountability systems will assure program responsiveness and will enhance the value of the programs to the employee and organization.


_ Expanded use of new technologies and alternative training techniques and methods is endorsed and encouraged.


_ The Land Management Institute concept is endorsed by the National Park Service, with a strong emphasis given to collaboration among many agencies.


_ The Williamsport Preservation Training Center, its realignment with the Training and Development Division, and its Preservation and Skills Training (PAST) program are endorsed; base funding will be sought. The PAST program will be expanded to include additional career fields.


_ The Conservation Study Institute is endorsed, and base funding will be sought.


_ Implementation has begun, and all components will be fully operational by 1998.

Implications


Under this plan, employees will have increased opportunities for development. A description of training appropriate to each career field will be available to all employees. Training programs will be evaluated on the basis of their impact on job performance. Supervisors, with the support of the Training and Development Community, will ensure that all employees receive appropriate training in a timely manner. Employees will receive a foundation in the mandated responsibilities of the National Park Service followed by periodic re-orientation. Employees will have opportunities to sustain career development and professional growth apart from essential competencies training. Funding and positions will be sought for completion of the strategy described in this document. Physical facilities will be developed. The training and development program will facilitate information exchange and developmental opportunities among land management agencies and promote partnerships for expanded resources stewardship. The National Park Service will participate with other land management bureaus in the development and coordination of interagency training and employee development.Appendix A: The Training and Development Community

Roles, Responsibilities, Relationships

Employee


The employee is the focus for the implementation of the National Park Service mission. Individual employees use the National Park Service Training and Development Program to enhance their competencies and professional growth in order to fulfill this mission.

The Employee:


Has primary responsibility for his or her personal and professional development.


Uses the available resources (personal, from employer, and from external sources) to keep personal and professional competencies honed and appropriate to the position occupied in the organization.


Continuously seeks to maintain, improve, or expand competencies so that she or he remains vital to the fulfillment of the National Park Service mission.


Provides the supervisor and others in the Training and Development Community with current information on training and development needs required to keep his or her competencies at the highest possible level in the particular career field.


Shares personal expertise with others, to assist fellow team members in developing their own competencies.


Participates as a member of park and organizational teams.


The employee forms a partnership with the supervisor in identifying, developing, and managing a personal training and development plan. This plan will meet the goals and needs of the individual while providing the work team with the competencies needed to accomplish its mission. Through the supervisor, the employee has access to a variety of training and development professionals, including Career Counselors, Training Managers, Employee Development Specialists, and Organizational Development Specialists. These professionals will assist in defining, developing, and serving the individual development needs of the employee. Supervisor


The supervisor provides the central support and guidance to employees in developing their competencies to meet the work team's goals and fulfill the mission of the National Park Service. The supervisor helps the employees balance their personal goals and development needs with the needs of the work team and the organization, and assures that the employees' competencies remain current.

The Supervisor:


Identifies the competencies needed within the work team to reach the team's goals and to perform the work required.


Assesses the work team's current competencies, and identifies the team's training and development needs.


Works with employees to plan and implement individual training and development plans.


Consults with other members of the Training and Development Community to describe development needs, discover development opportunities, and assist training delivery to employees.


Has primary responsibility for assuring integration of learning in the workplace; provides a work environment that encourages practice of competencies learned in developmental activities; encourages diversity of ideas, cultures, and capabilities in meeting the work team's goals; and plans and allows for developmental activities as a routine part of the workgroup's activities and tasks.


Validates training and development activities by providing assessments of changes in employees' competencies following completion of development programs, and works with other members of the Training and Development Community to ensure that training programs are helping employees improve their competencies.


The supervisor forms a partnership with the employees in identifying, developing, and managing the employees' personal training and development plan. He or she also consults and works with other Training and Development Community members to ensure that delivery of training and development is providing the employees with improved competencies to meet the requirements of their jobs.Manager


The manager is the key to program evaluation and system accountability. Management assures that employees and supervisors are being trained to meet the current and future needs of the National Park Service.

The Manager:


Monitors training programs, especially for tracking trends within career fields.


Reviews supervisors' decisions regarding specific employee development efforts and also reviews their communications with the Training and Development Community.


Guarantees that overall National Park Service needs are being met, that employees are receiving proper and timely training, and that central offices and training centers are informed of changing trends and needs at the park (field unit) level.


Takes a personal interest in the training which supervisors receive and guides the supervisors' career development.


Serves as a crucial point of contact between field areas and the offices with mid-range training and development specialists.


The manager maintains close ties with the Training and Development Officers and Organizational Development Specialists in central offices. The manager consults regularly with all those who supervise employees who are engaged in, or in need of, training.Park (Unit) Training Team


The Park Training Team assists park supervisors and employees in identifying and meeting parkwide training and development needs. In certain instances, it performs a similar role for partnership cooperators.

The Park Training Team:


Coordinates and facilitates training opportunities and evaluates classroom learning.


Performs analysis to determine park developmental needs and analyzes results of assessments.


Maintains a complete file on all employees' training records and assists managers in determining what additional training is needed.


Provides career counseling to employees requesting career development service.


Serves as an advisory group which guides training and development programs within its purview.


Assists the Park Training Officer in researching, developing, and reviewing training and development programs by offering constructive feedback.


Assists the Park Training Officer in establishing training priorities and making selections for developmental experiences.


Monitors and evaluates overall training and development activities and provides input in revising and improving training activities.


In large parks, the team may have a full-time Park Training Officer; in smaller parks, this may be a collateral duty. The team can consist of a variety of park employees. It reports directly to the Superintendent or designated park official. It develops working relationships with individual employees, key central office staff, and partners.Training and Development Officer


The Training and Development Officer confers with National Park Service managers and employees and with professionals in other government agencies and the private sector to design and deliver a training and development program that builds employee and team competence, increases organizational effectiveness, and promotes the mission of the National Park Service.

The Training and Development Officer:


Consults with managers and employees to identify future trends, changes, opportunities, and problems that require new or modified knowledge and capabilities.


Functions as a liaison between parks, Organization Development Specialists, Training Centers, and Training Managers to provide ongoing assessment and feedback about individual, team and park development needs, training effectiveness, and improvement in performance and customer service.


Develops, coordinates, and evaluates courses and programs; contracts for instructors; instructs; evaluates transfer of learning from the classroom to the work site; and provides expertise in instructional design and training technology such as computer courseware.


Plans and facilitates conferences, meetings, and other functional, interdisciplinary, and partnership cooperators' gatherings.


Provides guidelines and assistance to park training teams and career counseling service to managers and employees.


Works with public and private sector organizations to design, improve and deliver training and development programs.


Serves as first-line supervisor for Career Counselors and Employee Development Specialists.


Training and Development Officers report to central office managers. Each officer develops and maintains effective working relationships with: (1) field employees and managers; (2) training and development colleagues and Organization Development Specialists; (3) Training Managers and Training Center staffs; and (4) professionals in other government agencies, universities, and private sector organizations.Employee Development Specialist or Assistant


The Employee Development Specialist or Assistant provides a range of training and administrative services. Among other things, he or she plans, develops, recommends, coordinates, facilitates, and evaluates training programs and oversees office support functions.

The Employee Development Specialist or Assistant:


Assists managers in assessing and analyzing development needs of individuals and conducts surveys of training needs.


Designs training experiences and uses approved evaluation methods to evaluate training effectiveness.


Determines course and session learning objectives, prepares lesson plans to satisfy learning objectives in personal instruction, and provides guidance to others to ensure the approved objectives of their instruction are achieved.


Develops and implements plans to support and foster the transfer of classroom knowledge and skills to the job.


Administers the budget, manages logistics, prepares and tracks purchasing and training documents, and provides administrative support and computer expertise.


This official reports to the Training and Development Division or Training and Development Officers; or if in a Training Center, to the Superintendent. In addition, he or she works with the National Park Service Training and Development Community; with employees, managers, and instructors; with vendors in the public and private sectors; and with administrative personnel throughout the organization.Career Counselor


The Career Counselor assists the organization in designing career development and counseling programs for all employees in a career field or functional group, and helps individual employees select training and development alternatives for their career progression.

The Career Counselor:


Develops and presents classroom instruction in career development and counseling.


Counsels employees and employee groups requesting career development and counseling service.


Evaluates career counseling and development programs within and outside the Service, and recommends new and improved programs for National Park Service employees.


Serves as a member of work groups developing employee career development and counseling programs.


Provides assistance and support to managers in the design and implementation of career development and counseling programs.


The Counselor reports to Training and Development Officers located in central offices and develops and maintains working relationships with colleagues in the larger career counseling community and with principal career field managers as well as individual employees and employee organizations.Organizational Development Specialist


The Organizational Development Specialist consults with managers and employees to analyze problems, processes, and relationships, and to recommend strategies to improve organizational effectiveness.

The Organizational Development Specialist:


Works with managers and employees to implement change, solve problems, and improve the relationships and processes between individuals and groups, works with management to set the strategic direction and goals for the organization, and acts as a resource person to management and the training and development community on issues related to the relationships of individuals and groups within the organization which do not require formal intervention efforts.


Proposes and develops practical models for improving organizational effectiveness appropriate to the organization's culture and needs.


Implements intervention strategies in a manner that successfully meets management's needs.


This position reports to central office managers. He or she develops and maintains relationships within the organization that encourage employees to request assistance and provides information and support required for successful situational analysis and corrective action. Training Center Superintendent


The Training Center Superintendent serves as the Center director responsible for the overall management and operation of the training and development program(s), including analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation.

The Training Center Superintendent:


Serves as first-line supervisor for all Center staff members.


Serves as principal Center representative in all short- and long-term planning activities associated with the Servicewide training initiative. Provides oversight for all Center planning.


Oversees the evaluation of all training and development offerings by Center staff.


Maintains contact with universities, colleges and other educational institutions, including private industry and professional training societies.


Maintains communications with park superintendents regarding Training Center operations and focus, soliciting feedback to strengthen traditional park values and operations throughout the training programs.


The Superintendent reports directly to the Chief, Training and Development Division (T&DD). Developing and maintaining a working relationship with the T&DD Chief, he or she supervises and manages the Training Managers and Training Specialists in support of the Center's assigned career fields. The Superintendent works with Training and Development Officers, with officials of nearby Service units, with local community leaders and elected officials, and with members of the larger Training and Development Community including potential contractors, college or university staff, and government officials. Training Manager


A Servicewide Training Manager carries the responsibility for the nationwide development and implementation of all training and employee development programs for a career field. The Training Manager is the focus of employee development for a career field, and is accountable for delivery of programs regardless of location, technology, methodology, or type of training.


Even though a Training Manager is located at a particular training center, the program that he or she manages may be conducted at a number of other locations through other means, including other National Park Service Training Centers, parks, regional offices, other agencies' training centers, universities, correspondence courses, and satellite uplink transmission.


A Servicewide Training Manager has a background in the technical aspects of the career field and in training and human resources development.

The Training Manager:


Serves as principal advisor or consultant to the managers of the career field at all levels of the organization, and provides substantive input into the annual review of the Servicewide training and employee development strategy and program, with specific recommendations for curriculum, new needs, and outdated programs.


Collects information on demographics and employee development needs from the staffs of parks and central offices for the career field, and works with public and private sector specialists to develop national strategies for designing training and development activities in the career field.


Assists career field managers in the preparation of those program requests and other information essential for the TM to serve as the occupation's principal spokesman in the development of the annual Servicewide training program and budget.


Serves as the overall manager of those developmental offerings calling for day-to-day oversight by the occupation's principal training specialists, and assures that all training is within the context of the national program goals, guidelines, and focus. Assists the organization in the development of career programs and career ladders for the career field.


Administers and tracks the professional development of personnel in the career field, keeping a national perspective on the training needs of the National Park Service, as well as the needs of employees in particular classification series. Uses a variety of methods and strategies to evaluate mentoring programs, advanced education programs, and cross-training assignments.


This position reports directly to the Training Center Superintendent, and maintains close working relationships with the managers in the occupational career field at all levels of the organization as well as with members of the Servicewide training community and professionals throughout the public and private sector.
Training Specialist


The Training Specialist designs, develops, coordinates, facilitates, and evaluates learning experiences using state-of-the-art principles and practices of instructional design, adult learning, performance improvement, training, employee development, organizational behavior, and other related training and development techniques.

The Training Specialist:


Consults with managers for whom the training is being considered or designed to ensure their support via their direct involvement in the design and development.


Return to the top

Uses the Instructional Systems Design approach to design training experiences.


Determines course and session learning goals and objectives, prepares lesson plans to satisfy learning objectives in personal instruction, and provides guidance to others to ensure the achievement of the approved objectives of their instruction.


Considers quality and cost of using internal vs. external resources in course design and/or instruction, recommends action to be taken, and negotiates approved contractual services.


Develops and implements plans to support and foster the transfer of classroom knowledge and skills to the job.


Uses organizationally approved program evaluation strategies that include performance improvement measures and return on investment.


This official serves as staff assistant and reports directly to Training Center Superintendents, provides overall management of training programs assigned for coordination, and maintains effective working relationships with managers and career field specialists.Chief, Training and Development Division


The Division Chief interacts with the National Leadership Council to determine how the Training and Development (T&D) Program will best support the Service's strategic direction; formulates and/or recommends Servicewide T&D policy; oversees the operation of the Centers; gains management support to implement and promote T&D initiatives; and provides feedback to the National Leadership Council on evaluation data and recommends Servicewide program changes.

The Division Chief:


Works with the National Leadership Council to establish the goals and objectives for the Service's T&D program consistent with the Service's current strategic plan.


Oversees the development and implementation of those policies and plans for the Servicewide T&D initiative needed to satisfy established goals and objectives.


Selects and implements those marketing strategies with the greatest promise of maximizing participation and management support for T&D plans and initiatives.


Develops and maintains those network linkages with the larger T&D community essential to ensuring the Service's familiarity with the state of the art in T&D.


Oversees the identification of needed program resource contracting requirements, the preparation of specifications and statements of work which identify desired outcomes in behavioral terms, and the establishment of criteria for reviewing and rating proposals.


Oversees the evaluation of program outcomes in terms of established program goals and objectives.


Provides leadership to the Training and Development Officers to implement the Servicewide training program in a consistent, wide-ranging manner.


This position reports directly to the Service's Deputy Director, supervises the Training and Development Division program and support staff, oversees the operation of the Training Centers, and acts as principal T&D consultant to National Leadership Council and Training and Development Officers. He or she is the principal Service contact with potential T&D contractors as well as with the larger T&D community.National Leadership Council


The National Leadership Council ensures that the National Park Service has the resources and direction needed to implement a training and development program that effectively serves its employees in accomplishing its missions.

The National Leadership Council:


Annually approves the national Training and Development Plan.


Sets direction for overall training and development needs.


Takes the lead in obtaining funds and resources required for implementation of the national Training and Development Plan.


Assures that the national Training and Development Plan fully embraces the concept of partnerships.


The Deputy Director supervises the Chief, Training and Development Division. The National Leadership Council regularly consults with the Division Chief and other members of the Training and Development Community on issues of funding and general direction in order to ensure that the training and development needs of the organization are met. The Chief of the Division will regularly attend the meetings of the National Leadership Council.Appendix B: Training Centers

Part 1: Existing Training Centers

Horace M. Albright Training Center

Role


The role of the Horace M. Albright Training Center is to train and educate National Park Service employees in National Park Service Orientation and Mission. It is located at the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

Functions


The Albright Training Center coordinates a comprehensive training and development program for the following career support function:


National Park Service Orientation and Mission


Conduct Introduction to National Park Service History, Mission, and Operations Courses that are designed to instill and reinforce the basic values, principles, and philosophy of the Service.


Educate all employees on the history of the System and the Service and how it serves as a foundation for today's park management.


Instill the National Park Service mission and organization values in employees through initial and periodic orientations.


Build teamwork through interaction of all career fields in realistic training and development exercises.


Reach out to National Park Service partners to orient them to the National Park Service history and mission.


Provide employees with a firm understanding of the agency's vision for the future.National Center for Preservation Technology and Training

Role


The role of the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training is to facilitate research and training in Preservation and Conservation Technology. The Preservation Center provides training and grants to facilitate research for state, local, and private organizations, and for National Park Service employees. The Center works closely with the Washington Office Cultural Resources Stewardship function, academic institutions, Federal laboratories, non-profit preservation and conservation organizations, local governments, individual professionals in the field of preservation and conservation, National Park Service units, and other agencies and organizations. It is located at Northwestern State University, Natchitoches, Louisiana.

Functions


The Preservation Center coordinates a comprehensive training and development program in:


Preservation and Conservation Technology


Provide both short- and long-term training in preservation technology and cultural resource management for professionals in the fields of historic architecture, history, landscape architecture, museum curation, planning, archeology, anthropology, and related disciplines.


Offer grants to facilitate preservation training activities undertaken by nonprofit organizations, local governments, states, academic institutions, and the National Park Service.


Serve as a clearinghouse for information relating to preservation technology research and training.National Interagency Fire Center at Boise

Role


One of several roles of the National Park Service component of the National Interagency Fire Center at Boise (NIFC) is to train and develop National Park Service employees in Fire Management, Aviation, and All Risk Management. NIFC currently works in partnership with the Ranger Activities Division and the Bureau of Land Management (host agency). The National Park Service unit shares in the primary purpose of NIFC, working in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service, the National Weather Service, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Office of Aircraft Services, and other agencies and organizations. NIFC is located at the National Interagency Fire Center at Boise, Idaho.

Functions


NIFC coordinates comprehensive training and development programs in:


Fire Management


Provide support, fire training, and technology transfer services with the purpose of more effectively managing fire.


Aviation


Train employees in the use, management, enforcement, and regulation of aviation activities throughout the Service.


All Risk Management


Instruct National Park Service employees in any and all risk management situations including but not limited to on-scene management structures called Incident Command System.


Provide standardized training that supports the effective operation of the National Interagency Incident Management System (NIIMS).


Provide a recommended qualification and certification subsystem for appropriate personnel.


Provide a publication management subsystem of NIIMS materials; as well as other supporting technologies such as orthophotographic mapping, infrared sensing, the National Fire Danger Rating System, and integrated NIIMS communications.National Park Service Law Enforcement Training

Role, Federal Law Enforcement Training Center


The role of the National Park Service Law Enforcement Training Center at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (NPS-FLETC) is to train and develop National Park Service employees in Law Enforcement and Resource Protection. NPS-FLETC currently works in partnership with the Ranger Activities Division; the U.S. Department of Treasury (host agency); approved SLETP colleges and universities; and other agencies and organizations. The National Park Service unit acts as the on-site Agency Representative for the Tennessee Valley Authority in all law enforcement training issues at FLETC. NPS-FLETC is located at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia, in conjunction with over seventy cooperating agencies.

Functions


NPS-FLETC coordinates a comprehensive training and development program in:


Law Enforcement and Resource Protection


Represent the National Park Service law enforcement function at NPS-FLETC.


Direct, organize, and coordinate the National Park Service Seasonal Law Enforcement Training Program (SLETP) Servicewide.


Coordinate the Servicewide Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) program.


Assist the National Park Service Headquarters Office in the development of law enforcement policies and guidelines.


Direct the semi-automatic rifle and pistol transition program.


Establish standards and provide agency supervision for specialized law enforcement training at the entry and advanced levels.


Develop presentations for advanced, in-service, and refresher training in specialized areas of law enforcement for delivery to field locations on an export basis.


Interpret law enforcement policies for national program center and field-level personnel.

Role, United States Park Police Training Branch


The role of the United States Park Police Training Branch is to train and develop U.S. Park Police officers in law enforcement and visitor protection. The U.S. Park Police Training Branch works in partnership with the Planning Branch of the Operations Division and the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center. It works closely with the NPS National Capital Region, the Washington Area Council of Governments, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the American Society of Law Enforcement Trainers, the F.B.I. National Academy, and state and local agencies in and around our areas of jurisdiction. The U.S. Park Police Training Branch is located at the Anacostia Operations Facility in Washington, D.C., and FLETC in Glynco, Georgia.

Functions


The U.S. Park Police Training Branch provides comprehensive training and employee development (T&D) in the following areas:


Law Enforcement and Resource Protection


Provide basic law enforcement training for entry-level recruits.


Coordinate and direct the recruit Field Training Program.


Organize and present the annual in-service refresher training.


Coordinate and respond to field operations training requests.


Develop and coordinate agency-specific specialized training (e.g., horse mounted, motorcycle, aviation, crime scene, EMT).


Represent the U.S. Park Police training needs and requirements to the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center.


Incorporate and promote new and advanced technology into current training programs.


Coordinate the Forcewide "Drug Abuse Resistance Education" (D.A.R.E.) program.


Coordinate and direct mandated training requirements (e.g., firearms, CPR, legal, AIDS awareness).


Coordinate and direct supervisory, mid-level management and command/executive development programs.


Provide assistance and training to state and local agencies.Stephen T. Mather Training Center

Role


The role of the Stephen T. Mather Training Center is to train and develop National Park Service employees in Interpretation, Education, and Cooperating Associations; Visitor Use Management; and Administration and Office Management Support. Mather is located on the historic Storer College campus, a part of the Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry, West Virginia.

Functions


The Mather Center coordinates comprehensive training and development programs for the following career fields:


Interpretation, Education, and Cooperating Associations


Provide training for National Park Service interpreters, education specialists, cooperating association coordinators, and field area interpretive skills training teams.


Visitor Use Management


Conduct training programs for all rangers and other National Park Service personnel who manage and plan for public use in concert with park resource management goals and legislated park purposes.


Administration and Office Management Support


Deliver training and development curricula to administrative and support staffs emphasizing budget and finance, acquisition, property, personnel, fundamentals of training, and office management.Williamsport Preservation Training Center

Role


The role of the Williamsport Preservation Training Center is to support preservation and maintenance of historic properties in the National Park Service by providing a comprehensive program of preservation education and employee development in Historic Preservation Skills and Crafts. It is presently a unit of the Harpers Ferry Center, but will become part of the Training and Development Division at the Washington Office. The Williamsport Preservation Training Center is currently located in buildings belonging to the C&O Canal National Historical Park in Williamsport, Maryland. It is scheduled to relocate to buildings at the Monocacy National Battlefield near Frederick, Maryland.

Functions


The Williamsport Center coordinates a comprehensive training and development program in:


Historic Preservation Skills and Crafts


Manage a three-year training program for both Exhibits and Preservation Specialists.


Offer training courses aimed at building the skills of field personnel responsible for the maintenance and preservation of historic properties.


Accomplish select historic preservation projects which provide hands-on experience for trainees.Appendix B, Part 2: Proposed Training Centers

Conservation Study Institute

Role


The role of the Conservation Study Institute is to educate and train National Park Service employees and the wider Park Service community in the history of Conservation and in the application of cooperative conservation, and to provide a forum for the examination and discussion of conservation perspectives. The Institute will be aligned with an academic institution and other cooperative partners. It will work in association with the Marsh-Billings National Historical Park in Woodstock, Vermont.

Functions


The Institute coordinates a comprehensive training and development program in:


Conservation


Develop and institute a course of study in the Foundations of American Conservation.


Develop and offer training programs in conservation history and in the application of current conservation practices.


Develop and offer printed, video-based, and computer-aided training references for individual use.


Develop a computerized data base on conservation publications and references.


Provide a forum for symposia, conferences, workshops, and retreats on conservation for practitioners and other interested groups.Denver Training Center

Role


The Denver Training Center will train and develop National Park Service employees in Planning, Design, and Construction; and Occupational Health and Safety. It will be associated with the Denver Service Center and other training facilities located in Denver, Colorado.

Functions


The Denver Center will coordinate comprehensive training and development programs for the following career fields:


Planning, Design, and Construction


Train employees in such topics as sustainable design, GIS, life safety and building codes, designing with computers, energy conservation, planning outside park boundaries, construction programming and funding, and design and construction workshops for managers.


Occupational Health and Safety


Deliver a program for designated Safety Officers, and all National Park Service employees having assigned collateral duties in Safety Management.Presidio Training Center

Role


The role of the future Presidio Training Center is to train and develop National Park Service employees in Maintenance; Resources Stewardship (Cultural Resource Stewardship and Natural Resource Stewardship); and Supervision, Management, and Leadership. The Presidio will train international park personnel in the management of park resources throughout the world, and it will manage the Center for Resources Management Leadership, the National Park Service Correspondence School Unit, and the National Park Service Training Audiovisual Unit. It will be located at Fort Scott within the boundaries of Golden Gate National Recreation Area, San Francisco, California.

Functions


The Presidio will coordinate comprehensive training and development programs for the following career fields and career support functions:


Maintenance


Prepare a program for National Park Service maintenance and engineering staff.


Resources Stewardship: Cultural


Provide instruction for National Park Service employees who are engaged in the management of cultural resources in such fields as anthropology, archeology, cultural landscapes, curation, ethnography, historical architecture, and history. (Cultural Resources Stewardship will be managed at Mather Training Center until the Presidio Training Center is functional.)


Resources Stewardship: Natural


Organize a program for National Park Service employees who are engaged in the management of natural resources in the fields of air quality, geographic information systems, water resources, and wildlife and vegetation. (Natural Resources Stewardship will eventually be assigned to the Presidio Training Center.)


Supervision, Management, and Leadership


Prepare a program for all National Park Service employees who aspire to be or are already supervisors and managers, and for all employees at all levels who wish to practice leadership skills in the National Park Service.


Center for Resources Management Leadership


Organize a departmental center to provide upper-level management and leadership with interagency and interdisciplinary programs in resource management.


National Park Service Correspondence School Unit


Create a National Park Service function to review, evaluate, and select appropriate existing correspondence course materials for use by National Park Service employees, and to develop and administer specialized correspondence courses for National Park Service needs.


National Park Service Training Audiovisual Unit


Create a National Park Service function to do the direct production and contracting for video-based training and education programs.Washington Training Center

Role


The role of the Washington Training Center is to train and develop National Park Service employees in Recreation and Conservation Programs, Information Management, Specialty Fields, and Organizational Development. It is located in Washington, D.C.

Functions


The Washington Center coordinates comprehensive training and development programs for the following career fields:


Recreation and Conservation Programs


Prepare a training program for National Park Service employees who are providing historic preservation, recreation, and conservation assistance to state and local governments, non-government organizations, and other partners-including but not limited to Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance; National Heritage Area Assistance; Long-Distance Trails Studies; National Historic and National Natural Landmark programs; Preservation Tax Incentives; Archeological Public Education and Outreach; and Technical Assistance to the Tax Act.


Information Management


Provide training for National Park Service employees who are responsible for planning, programming, and managing data and telecommunications systems, information management programs, and resource-related computer systems for field areas and central offices.


Specialty Fields


Provide instruction for National Park Service employees who have specialized jobs that are few in number including but not limited to Public Affairs, International Affairs, Photography, Legislative and Congressional Affairs, Visual Information, Writing-Editing, Cartography, Lands, and Concessions.


Organizational Development


Prepare a program for National Park Service employees involved in organization development including Training Center Superintendents, Training Managers, Training Specialists, Training and Development Officers, Employee Development Specialists and Assistants, Career Counselors, Organizational Development Specialists, and Equal Opportunity Specialists.Appendix C: List of Occupational Series by Career Field


Occupational series are listed below for each career field. In most cases the listings are representative but not all-inclusive. An occupation may be listed under more than one field. The intention is to ensure that employees have access to all relevant training opportunities. Some job titles below have more occupational series designations than can be listed here and are marked with an asterisk (_).

Administration and Office Management Support


Personnel Management Group (excluding GS-0235) GS-0200


General Administration GS-0300


(excluding communication series and GM-0301/0340 as appropriate)


Secretary GS-0318


Clerk-Typist GS-0322


Office Automation Clerk GS-0326


Clerical Assistant, Program Assistant GS-0344


Accounting and Budget Group GS-0500


Contracting Series GS-1102


Financial Analyst GS-1160


Supply GS-2000

Fire Management, Aviation, All Risk Management


Park Ranger GS-0025


Structural Fire Management GS-0081


Radio Operator GS-0389


Communications Specialist GS-0392


General Biological Science GS-0401


Fire Fighter (Wildland) GS-0462


Fire Protection Engineering GS-0804


Aviation Safety GS-1825


General Supply Series GS-2001


Aircraft Operation Series GS-2181

Historic Preservation Skills and Crafts


Architectural Historian GS-0170


Architectural Technician GS-0802


Historical Architect GS-0808


Exhibit Specialist (Preservation) GS-1010


Conservator GS-1015/1016


Facility Manager GS-1640


Mason, Masonry Worker WG/WL/WS-3603


Wood Worker WG-4604


Woodcrafter WG/WS-4605


Carpenter WB/WG/WL/WS-4607

 

Information Management

Office Automation and Systems Support


Computer Operator GS-0332


Computer Specialist GS-0334


Telecommunications GS-0390/0391/0392


Computer Engineering Series GS-0854


Computer Science Series GS-1550

Resources-Related Computer Systems


Engineering Technician (Drafting) GS-0802


Landscape Architect, Architect, Engineer GS-0807/0808/0800


Visual Information Specialist/Technician GS-1084/1001


Remote Sensing Applications Specialist GS-1301


Geologist GS-1350


Cartographer/Cartographic Technician GS-1370/1371


Geodesy Series/Geodetic Technician GS-1372/1374


Photographic Technologist GS-1386


Computer Science Series GS-1550

Technical Information Storage and Retrieval


Librarian GS-1410


Technical Information Specialist/Technician GS-1412/1411


Archives Technician GS-1421

Interpretation, Education, and Cooperating Associations


Interpretive Planner GS-0020/0023


Park Ranger (Interpretation) GS-0025


Historian, Archeologist, Anthropologist GS-0170/0190/0193


Biological Sciences GS-0400


Communication Arts Related Series GS-1010,1082,1084


Museum Curator GS-1015


Public Affairs (Marketing) GS-1035


Audiovisual Production GS-1071


Business Administration GS-1101


Library and Archives Group GS-1400


General Education and Training Series GS-1701

Law Enforcement and Resource Protection


Park Ranger GS-0025


Fire Protection and Prevention GS-0081


Police Series GS-0083


Park Police SP-0083


Security Guard GS-0085


Guide Series GS-0090


Radio Operator GS-0389


Communications Specialist GS-0392


Paralegal Specialist GS-0950


Criminal Investigations GS-1811


Game Law Enforcement GS-1812

Maintenance


There are more than 80 specific classification series found in National Park Service maintenance activities. The following classification families contain all these individual series.


General Engineer, Construction Engineer GS-0801


Construction Representative GS-0809


Civil Engineer GS-0810


Exhibit Specialist GS-1010


Specifications Writer GS-1083


Facility Manager GS-1640


Equipment Specialist GS-1670


Equipment and Facilities Management Student Trainee GS-1699


Electronic Equipment Installation and Maintenance. WG-2600


Electrical Installation/Maintenance Family WB/WG/WL/WS-2800


Fabric and Leather Work WG-3100


Instrument Work WG-3300


Machine Tool Work WG-3400


General Services and Support Work WB/WG/WL/WS-3500


Structural and Finishing Work WG/WL/WS-3600


Metal Processing WB/WG-3700


Metal Work WG/WS-3800


Motion Picture, Radio, TV and Sound Equipment Operator WG-3900


Painting and Papering WB/WG/WL/WS-4100


Plumbing and Pipefitting WB/WG/WS-4200


Printing WG/WS-4400


Wood Work WB/WG/WL/WS-4600


General Maintenance and Operations WB/WG/WL/WS-4700


General Equipment Maintenance WB/WG-4800


Plant and Animal Work WG/WL/WS-5000


Miscellaneous Occupations WB/WG/WL/WS-5200


Industrial Equipment Maintenance. WG/WL/WS-5300


Industrial Equipment Operating WB/WG/WL/WS-5400


Transportation and Mobile Equipment Operation WB/WG/WL/WS-5700


Transportation and Mobile Equipment Maintenance. WB/WG/WL/WS-5800


Armament Work WG-6600


Warehousing and Stock Handling WG/WL/WS-6900


Food Preparation and Serving WG/WS-7400


Engine Overhaul WG-8600

Occupational Health and Safety


Safety and Occupational Health Management Series GS-0018


Safety Technician GS-0019


Industrial Hygiene GS-0690


Safety Engineering Series GS-0803


Aviation Safety GS-1825

 

Organizational Development


Organizational Development Specialist GS-


Employee Development Specialist GS-0235


Equal Opportunity Specialist GS-0260


Training Specialist GS-1710


Instructor GS-1711

 

Planning, Design, and Construction

Park Planning and Facility Development Support


Senior Program Manager Senior Executive Series


Planner, Planning Technician GS-0020/0021/0023


Park/Program Manager GS/GM-0340/0025


Economist, Geographer GS-0110/0150


Historian, Archeologist, Anthropologist GS-0170/0190/0193


Natural Resources Specialist (13 disciplines) GS-0401


Soil Conservationist GS-0457


Natural and Cultural Resources, Coop/Technician GS-0199/0499


Landscape Architect GS-0807


Concession Analyst GS-1101

Planning Design and Construction


General Engineer and Engineering Technician GS-0801/0802


Safety Engineer GS-0803


Landscape Architect GS-0807


Architect (General, Historical) GS-0808

 

Construction Representative GS-0809

 

(Project Supervisor: Engineer or Landscape Architect)


Civil, Highway, Structural Engineer GS-0810


Engineering Draftsman GS-0818


Environmental Engineer GS-0819


Mechanical Engineer GS-0830


Electrical Engineer GS-0850


Exhibits Specialist (Restoration) GS-1010

Technical Support to Planning, Design, and Construction


Estimator (Construction and Professional Services) GS-0802


Writer, Writer-Editor, Editorial Assistant GS-1082/1087


Specifications Writer/Editor GS-1083


Visual Information Specialist/Technician GS-1084/1001


Contract Specialist and Contract Administration GS-1102


Procurement Clerk GS-1106


Cartographic Technician GS-1371


Land Surveyor GS-1373


Printing Management GS-1654


Microphotographer, Bindery Operator WG-4401/4402


Offset Press Operator, Photographer WG-4414/4417

Recreation and Conservation Programs


Community Planner and Outdoor Recreation Planner GS-0020/0023


Recreation and Park Management GS-0025


Recreation Specialist Series GS-0188


Economist, Sociologist, Geographer GS-0119/0150/0184


Historian, Anthropologist, Archeologist GS-0170/0190/0193


Management and Program Analyst GS-0343


General Biology and Ecology GS-0401/0408


Accounting and Budget Group (multiple series) GS-0500


Engineer (multiple series) GS-0800


Architect, Historical Architect GS-0808


Landscape Architect GS-0807


General Arts and Information (multiple series) GS-1000-1099


Contracting GS-1102


Property Disposal GS-1104

Resources Stewardship

 

Natural Resources


Outdoor Recreation Planner GS-0023


Park Manager GS-0025


Park Ranger (Resources Management) GS-0025


Environmental Protection Specialist GS-0028


Biological Sciences Group (34 series) GS-0400


Natural Resources Specialist GS-0401


Natural Resources Trainee GS-0499


Physical Sciences Group (26 series) GS-1300


Remote Sensing Applications Specialist GS-1301


Computer Science Series (RDM) GS-1550

 

Cultural Resources


Interpretive Planner GS-0020/0023/0025


Park Manager or Park Ranger (LE and RM) GS-0025


Historian or Architectural Historian GS-0170


Anthropologist or Ethnographer GS-0190


Archeologist GS-0193


Cultural Resources Specialist GS-0170/0190/0193


Cultural Resources Student Trainee GS-0199


Historical Architect GS-0808


Landscape Architect GS-0807


Exhibits Specialist GS-1010


Museum Curator Series GS-1015


Museum Specialist and Technician GS-1016


Facility Manager GS-1640

Specialty Fields


Equal Opportunity Specialist GS-0260


International Cooperation Specialist GS-0301


Legislative Affairs Specialist GS-0301


Conservator GS-1000


Interior Design GS-1008


Public Affairs Specialist GS-1035


Photographer GS-1060


Writer-Editor GS-1082


Visual Information Specialist GS-1084


Concessions Specialist or Concessions Assistant GS-1100


Concessions Analyst GS-1101


Concessions Contract Analyst GS-1101


Realty Specialist GS-1170


Appraiser GS-1171


Cartographic Technician GS-1371


Land Surveyor GS-1373


General Inspection, Investigation and Compliance GS-1801

Supervision, Management, and Leadership


All occupational series are represented in this field.

Visitor Use Management


Life Guard, Scuba, Dive Master GS- _


Park Ranger (LE, I, and RM)GS-0025 GS-0025


Radio Operator GS-0389


Communications Specialist GS-0392


Cash Processing GS-0530


Facility Manager GS-1640 Appendix D: Work In Progress


Return to the top

The Training and Development Strategy provides a framework for action but is not intended to fill in specific details such as a training curriculum. The implementation details are currently being developed by nineteen work groups that will consider and include the work already accomplished by other Servicewide initiatives, committees, and task groups. The National Leadership Council will be provided with the results of these efforts in November of 1995 for review and approval. As approved, the results will be implemented beginning in January of 1996.


Shown below are the work groups, brief descriptions of purposes, due dates for their reports, and Chairs. The groups include all employees who applied for the work as the result of a national announcement.

Design of Management Recertification Training

Design a training program to be given to all existing and new supervisors and managers (fully implemented within two years). Report due January 1995. Chair: Bill Wade, Shenandoah National Park.

Career Binder and Graphics Design; Design of Forms and Procedures

Create new processes, forms, and procedures to implement the training strategy; develop comprehensive graphics design. Reports due February 1995; July 1995. Chair: Mike Clayton, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Personnel Practices

Visit each Training Center and evaluate existing organizations and grade structures. Report due February 1995. Chair: Ed Carlin, Albright Training Center.

Correspondence Course Unit Design

Define national correspondence unit at the Presidio in terms of purpose, size, and needed resources. Report due March 1995. Chair: Dianne Cooper, Pacific Northwest Regional Office.

Identification of Essential Competencies for all Career Fields

Establish procedures for the development of all competencies by all career fields, monitor, and provide advice as needed. Report due April 1995. Chair: Mike Watson, Mather Training Center.

Presidio Training Center

Recommend staffing and space pattern to accomplish objectives at the Presidio and provide implementation schedule for the project. Report due April 1995. Chair: Doug Morris, Saguaro National Park.

Denver Training Center

Determine where functions should reside and be staffed. Report due April 1995. Chair: Leslie Hart, Denver Service Center.

National Center for Preservation Technology and Training

Meet with college and program directors to develop cooperative relations and understandings concerning the role of the Center. Report due April 1995. Chair: Frances Gale, National Center for Preservation Technology and Training, Natchitoches, Louisiana.

Review and Analysis of Mandated Training

Evaluate and review all training and developmental programs which are described as mandated functions. Report due April 1995. Chair: Lucia Bragan, Training and Development Program-Washington Office.

Capital Training Center

Evaluate existing facilities for adequacy and determine staffing. Report due April 1995. Chair: Flip Hagood, Capital Training Center.

Advanced Degree and Certificate Program

Define the program and the fields it will include, and describe how it will be paid for and supported. Report due June 1995. Chair: Ted Hillmer, Midwest Regional Office.

Intake Trainee Program

Review all elements of the existing intake trainee program, recommending any needed changes or enhancements. Report due June 1995. Chair: Chris Perry, Washington Office.

Career Development and Professional Growth

Review essential competencies product to determine training needs that go beyond essentials. Report due July 1995. Chair: Jeri Mihalic, Columbia Falls, Montana.

Video Production and New Technologies

Evaluate and review new technologies and video capabilities that support training and employee development programs. Report due July 1995. Chair: Jim Boyd, Albright Training Center.

Training Centers Rehabilitation

Evaluate existing training facilities within context of new strategy. Report due August 1995. Chair: Sue McGill, Washington Office.

Land Management Institute

Establish working arrangements with other land management agencies. Report due September 1995. Chair: Gil Lusk, Albright Training Center.

Inter-Agency and University Agreements

Identify all agencies and universities with existing cooperative agreements; negotiate new agreements after approval. Report due October 1995. Chair: J.T. Reynolds, Rocky Mountain Regional Office.

Career Fields Curriculum Design

Begin preparation of specific curriculum recommendations for all career fields. Report due October 1995. Chair: Rick Shireman, Mesa Verde National Park.

Conservation Study Institute

Develop overall concepts and strategies for a new center to address the history of conservation. Report due October 1995. Chair: Judy Hart, Washington Office.Appendix E: Land Management Institute Proposal


The Land Management Institute concept, a collaborative project to be pursued in cooperation with other agencies of the Department of the Interior and the U.S. Forest Service, is fully endorsed by this national strategy. In support of it, five actions are set forth below.


1. A multi-party and multi-agency agreement will be sought for joint training and for cross-utilization of training facilities and staff; this agreement will include the following agencies and facilities:


Bureau of Land Management


National Training Center, Arizona


Bureau of Reclamation


Administrative Service Center, Colorado


National Biological Survey


National Center for Ecology, Colorado


National Park Service


Mather Training Center, West Virginia


Albright Training Center, Arizona


National Center for Preservation Technology and Training, Louisiana


Presidio Training Center, California


Williamsport Historic Preservation Center, West Virginia


Capital Training Center, Washington, D.C.


Denver Training Center, Colorado


Conservation Study Institute, Vermont


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service


National Conservation Training Center

, West Virginia


U.S. Forest Service


Pinchot Institute for Conservation Studies, Pennsylvania


Carhart Wilderness Institute, Montana


National Advanced Resources Technology Center, Arizona


Other agencies as defined


2. An interagency council will be formally established, in the agreement noted above, to define the role and function of the parties and to generally develop and administer the working agreements. The intent of this process will be to support a collaborative and collegial atmosphere and working environment and not to direct or otherwise manage the program.


3. In support of the two actions described above, a small working group representing the named agencies will be established to determine common interest in this proposal and, if an agreement to proceed is reached, to begin to develop the training agreement and its details.


4. A briefing for the Department of the Interior and U.S. Forest Service will be scheduled and presented in Calendar Year 1995.


5. If agreement is reached and approval received from all parties, the agreement could be implemented by the beginning of 1995.

Land Management Institute

Potential Campus System

USFWS National Conservation Training Center: Threatened and Endangered Species, species management, and resources management programs that extend beyond National Park Service boundaries.

BLM National Training Center: Hazardous waste management, introductory and intermediate supervision, Native American programs, and computer systems.

Pinchot Institute: Multicultural programs and interagency workshops.

Carhart Wilderness Management Center: Wilderness management.

National Interagency Fire Center and National Advanced Resources Technology Center: Wildland fire management, structural fire fighting, Incident Command System training, and All Risk Management systems.

Bureau of Reclamation Administrative Service Center: Computer and software systems, interagency networking, and team building processes.

Mather Training Center: Visitor information systems, and interpretation and education.

Albright Training Center: Introductory supervision, team building, and interactive skills. Resource-based problem analysis and solution.

The Presidio: Executive leadership, advanced resource stewardship studies, networking, and partnering with public, private, and international sectors.

Williamsport Preservation Training Center: Hands-on restoration and preservation technology, and techniques for preserving cultural resources.

Capital Training Center: Congressional relations, legislative and budget processes, how the government works, and interagency assignments.

Denver Training Center: Planning, Design, and Construction, and Occupational Health and Safety.

Conservation Study Institute: History of conservation, applications of cooperative conservation, and perspectives on the future of conservation.

National Center for Preservation Technology and Training: Preservation technology and studies for all cultural resources.

Federal Law Enforcement Training Center: Law enforcement and resource protection, emergency reaction, and crowd control.

National Center for Ecology: Advanced science and academic study.

 

Appendix F: Departmental Executive Leadership Program - A Proposal

Need


We place value on the future leaders of our land managing agencies, and we seriously regard the potential benefits of ecosystem-level interaction between and among federal, state, private, and industry groups. The benefits derived from better decision-making processes, more competent leadership, and professional career development programs, as envisioned by the Senior Executive Service (SES), will eliminate agency confrontation and reactionary management scenarios from half of our decision-making processes and would far outweigh any costs.


The Presidio location becomes the interagency campus for leadership and high-level resource management programs. As such, it does not replace or impact existing programs or training centers within the Department of the Interior or the Forest Service.


There is also a strong correlation between this activity and that called for by the President's initiative to reinvent and professionalize the government work force and programs.

Operation


The Center for Resources Management Leadership (working name) will be funded by the Department of the Interior and staffed by a multi-agency group of personnel. The Center would be directed by an SES-level leader. Each participating agency would place an executive level leader at the facility to coordinate for that agency and be party to the management of the facility. The U.S. Forest Service, in addition to the Department of the Interior, would also be included in this facility.


Funding for the Center would assure the necessary amounts for all operating and staffing costs: funding to support full costs for 120 residential students per year, funding to maintain an audio-visual unit and a correspondence course unit at the Center, and funding for all students at 20 short courses each year and necessary scholarships for private sector and international students.


The Center would be a part of the national campus system of the Land Management Institute. The Center would have representation on its staff from each of the agencies involved with the system as well as highly respected individuals from the private sector and the university system.


This facility would be a residential facility with opportunities for evening sessions and small work group sessions as required by the curriculum. Students coming to the facility for the six-month program would be in the process of being transferred to a new duty station, that assignment contingent on successful completion of the program. Full provision would be made in the program for dual-career and single parents with children. Completion of the six-month residential program would result in the following actions:


Full evaluation of the student for future leadership and for assignments in the Department of the Interior or other appropriate organization.


Reassignment of the student to an executive leadership position.


Awarding of a Master's degree in Public Resources Management Leadership.


Development of a career track for the individual based on successful completion of the next assignment.


Establishment of a career network with fellow students and the Center.


Establishment of an executive mentor for the student.


Placement of a career profile with the Center.


Accumulation of a comprehensive library of project and thesis work at the Center.


Pre-SES screening of candidates.


Development of a diverse work force and placement of qualified multicultural leaders in key leadership postings.

Staffing


The Center staff would be composed of an equal number of personnel from agencies participating in the program plus an equal number from international resource management agencies and from the private sector. If staffing were to consist of thirty people, then that number would be divided by the total of all the agencies plus one for international plus one for private sector. If that resulted in ten groups, then each group would have three employees at the Center. This mixture of personnel would form a team which would work together for two years and also create an exciting work environment. Key agency staff might be selected from candidates who had graduated from the residential program during the preceding three years, or from other areas.

Affiliation


The Center would be fully associated with Stanford University and the University of California at Berkeley for purposes of degree programs, curriculum, and visiting professors. Other associations would also be possible at the national and international level.

Why the Presidio?


Some will rightly point out that a program of this type is or could be offered at any number of locations in the United States. The strength of the Presidio lies in its ability to offer a residential program for the students and a self-contained and specialized campus environment. One of the cornerstones of this program evolves from the team dynamics and networking that can result from a residential and high-energy program like this. The facilities will need to be updated and modernized and this will be a cost, but having a facility like this in the San Francisco area with its various intellectual and cultural amenities will well justify that cost as opposed to new construction on available lands well away from this type of complex. It should also be noted that the cost of housing both staff and students in this urban center will be minimal compared to other such facilities in comparable locations.

Time Frame


This proposal, if pursued, would be implemented over a three-year period and would require private sector involvement and support. By the year 2005, assuming graduation of 120 students per year starting in 1997, the Department of the Interior and its agencies could require that all line managers GS-14 and above will have successfully completed this program as a condition of advancement to key line positions and to the SES.

Appendix G: Conservation Study Institute Proposal

Need


National Park Service staff members practice conservation as their profession; exposure of all employees to the broader picture and history of conservation will benefit this daily application. Programs will not duplicate existing academic degree programs; rather, they will create programs tailored to National Park Service and other federal employees, as well as current and future partners. Employees of other government agencies and citizens involved in conservation efforts have much to offer to each other. Academic research can inform our practices; our practices can inform academic research. Differing perspectives and experiences of all can widen and deepen the thoughts of all of us, and contribute to improving and expanding the conservation of our collective national resources.

Operation


The Conservation Study Institute will teach courses in conservation's history, current status, and future. It will emphasize collaborative conservation, the achievement of conservation goals working with partners in state and local government, with organizations and universities, and with involved citizens. It will include current programs available for conservation, and such partnership skills as dispute resolution. Teachers, students, and partners will include individuals inside and outside government, encouraging exchange of perspective as well as experience.


The Conservation Study Institute will be developed by the National Park Service in association with universities with expertise in environmental education and with private partners. Each partner will provide coordinating staff, and will contribute to operational funding, facilities, or services.


Administrative headquarters will be at a university. The site will be recommended in Fiscal Year 1995. Learning facilities will remain flexible and will include use of university facilities and private facilities, and for some projects, going to the site with the program.


The Conservation Study Institute will have an association with the Marsh-Billings National Historical Park, site of the beginning of the current conservation movement. This association will be defined over the course of the planning year.

Programs


A course in the Foundations of American Conservation will be developed for all National Park Service employees. This program will be made available through video, computer, and hard copy so that it will be accessible to all employees.


Additional courses will be developed that include deeper and broader study of the large context of conservation, including international efforts, the basis of conservation in law, and conservation in the context of cultural change.


Programs also will include consideration of future developments in conservation.


Programs will be developed for the staff and the managing boards of heritage areas. The programs will address both the tools available for cooperative conservation and the techniques for working together to accomplish conservation, including alternatives for dispute resolution.


Programs will be developed for areas with issues to be addressed outside existing park boundaries. These programs will include both the tools for addressing issues outside park boundaries and the approaches for groups to work together to address issues.


Programs will be developed to foster understanding and application of sustainable design.


Specific issues may be brought to the Institute for a combination of training and participating in the process of addressing issues at hand.

Staffing


The coordinating staff will consist of federal employees as well as university and other partner staff. The teaching staff will consist of federal employees, other government staff, and university and private partner staff.

Associated Operations


University students and others will carry on research supporting the educational program. Additional affiliated efforts could include exchange programs, visiting scholar programs, visiting lecture series, publications of programs or research, and printed and video educational programs for a wider audience.

Affiliation


The university or school selected for operation of this institute will be able to provide a link with the Marsh-Billings National Historical Park now in planning in Woodstock, Vermont. George Perkins Marsh grew up at this site in Vermont, and his boyhood years and his later experiences inspired his writing of Man and Nature, published in 1864. The publication of Man and Nature is considered the beginning of the conservation movement in this country. The nature of this affiliation will be determined over the course of the planning year, and will be determined in part by the location of the selected academic partner or partners.Appendix H: Glossary

Benchmark


A well-defined, widely accepted standard of performance that is used to measure an individual's progress toward a specific level of competency.

Career Field


A collection of occupations and tasks that require similar or related knowledge, skills, and abilities.

Career Ladder


An organizational guide that charts movement within the career field.

Career Pathway


A personal roadmap that charts movement among a variety of experiences, levels, and job types, beginning at the entry level and progressing toward the achievement of individual goals.

Competency


A combination of knowledge, skills, and abilities in a particular career field, which, when acquired, allows a person to perform a task or function at a specifically defined level of proficiency.

Essential Competency


A competency that forms part of the vital knowledge, skills, and abilities for an individual career field; an essential competency is critical for an employee to perform effectively at any level in a career field.

National Leadership Council


A group composed of the Director, the Deputy Director, Associate Directors, and Regional Directors, which provides overall leadership to the National Park Service.

Professional Development


A process for recognizing an employee's career goals and providing opportunities to grow beyond essential competencies; methods include mentoring, certification, advanced degrees, special assignments, correspondence courses, and fellowships.

Training and Development


Training is a process through which an employee develops the knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform a job.


Development is a process that provides growth opportunities to learn beyond essential competence to build individual and organizational effectiveness.

Training and Development Community


A network of individuals and roles, starting with the employee and supervisor, including a variety of training and development professionals, extending through Training Managers and other development specialists, and ending with the National Leadership Council.

The End

(Appendix I is not included)

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Essential Competencies
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Last Update: October 16, 2002
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