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ARCHEOLOGY

Essential Competencies

Introduction: Archeology is a scientific discipline that merges the humanities' study of human activities, behavior, and thoughts with a scientific approach, methods, and techniques to this subject matter. Archeology is concerned with tools and other artifacts of human culture, heir relative contexts, and related environmental data. The archeologist attempts to reconstruct and interpret the past by analyzing, dating, and comparing systematically investigated sites and artifacts through the analysis of material remains, other evidence of human activity, and their contexts. There are two major types of archeology in the U.S.: archeology of everything preceding the earliest period of recorded history in a given area, or "prehistoric" archeology; and the archeology from the appearance in a given area of written records, referred to as document or text-aided "historical" archeology.

The concerns of archeologists can be summarized as follows:

Archeological sites and materials should be protected, preserved, investigated, and interpreted in a systematic, controlled, and scientific matter. This is often accomplished in federally mandated compliance through archeological survey, testing, and data retrieval procedures.

Information about the locations and significance of archeological resources should be taken into account when making decisions about modern development, land use, or operations.

Information about archeology and archeological resources should reach the public in a form that they can readily understand and appreciate by providing an accurate and "de-jargonized" explanation of the archeological investigation and its result in terms of what was found and how this information adds to or modifies our understanding of human history and prehistory.

Following is a list of the competencies and the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) needed to perform in this particular discipline at the Entry, Developmental, and Full Performance levels. The competencies are in boldface print and are followed by a brief definition. The definitions are then followed by a list of the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to be effective at each level. The competencies and KSAs of the previous level(s) are also required at the next higher level.

Archeological Technician (GS-0102)

Archeological technicians are specialist in archeology-related fields such as photography; fieldwork, excavation, surveying and mapping; artifact collection, cleaning, sorting and labelling; automated data base management; field logistics; equipment management; and other assistance functions. Technicians possessing the competencies of this level have the knowledge and analytical skills equivalent to an advanced undergraduate educational level or a Bachelor's Degree in anthropology, archeology, history, or a related field with specialized training in archeology. Archeological technicians perform under the direct supervision of a professional archeologist.

Field experience as part of an archeological field crew or field school.

Archeologist

ENTRY LEVEL (GS-0193)

Description: Archeologists possessing the competencies of the Entry Level have the knowledge and analytical skills equivalent to a Bachelor's Degree in anthropology, archeology, history, or a related field with specialized training in archeology. At this level, archeologists serve on the professional staff at a park or other facility under the direction of a supervisory archeologist. They deal with archeological resource identification, documentation, protection, interpretation, and preservation; and carry out or assist in limited scope monitoring, survey, testing, and excavating archeological sites; lab work and managing of field data; and the production of small-scale reports.

I. Professional Discipline

Provides general information and knowledge about archeology.

Fundamental knowledge of archeology equivalent to the completion of an accredited curriculum leading to a bachelor's degree in anthropology or archeology-related field with basic competency acquired through field school and/or experience.

Supervisory field experience at the level of crew chief.

Familiarity with techniques for archeological survey, testing, excavation and data retrieval, condition/integrity assessment, remote sensing of archeological sites, archeological sampling strategies, and other basic field and laboratory procedures.

II. Preservation Law, Philosophy, and Practice

Provides general information and knowledge on the identification, evaluation, documentation, treatment, and management of cultural resources, especially those archeological in nature.

Possesses broad, but basic understanding and knowledge in preservation law, philosophy, and practice.

Familiarity with national cultural resource laws and regulations, policies, and National Park Service regulations, policies, and guidelines relating to archeological and cultural resources.

III. Research and Inventories

Under the direct supervision of a professional archeologist, conducts basic research on archeological topices and participates in archeological surveys and excavations and documents all work in accordance with professional standards.

A. Archeological Investigations

Ability to conduct small-scale, limited scope archeological investigations using a variety of techniques and preparing a wide range of archeological documentation.

Ability to assist other professional archeologists in conducting archeological monitoring, surveys, and excavations; including the location of sites, recording of archeological and environmental dta, and summarization of information collected.

Knowledge of the techniques involved in maintaining field notes and preparing field descriptions, drawings, map, surveying instruments and their appropriate uses, photographs, and video recordings related to the archeological fieldwork.

Knowledge of basic professional procedures in organizing hard and digitally generated records such as site files, base maps, and other data.

Knowledge of basic professional procedures and operations in conducting archeological ite monitoring, archeological surveys, archeological investigations and testing.

Knowledge of local and regional prehistory and/or history needed to assist in analyzing and processing archeological data and material resulting from fieldwork.

B. Laboratory Analysis/Conservation of Field Collections

Carries out limited scope laboratory procedures, including analyzing, accessioning, cataloging, and preserving artifacts, and data generated by the field activities.

Ability to assist other professional archeologists in preparing site information for updating the Archeological Sites Management Information System (ASMIS), the Cultural Sites Inventory (CSI); the NPS Geographic Information System (GIS); and the Automated National Catalog System (ANCS+).

Knowledge of laboratory analysis and artifact curation to accession, catalog, analyze, and preserve artifacts and data generated by the survey.

Skills in photography, dark room techniques, and graphic recording techniques to prepare photographs and other visual displays for recording the results of archeological surveys, and preparing acceptable reports.

IV. Preservation, Treatment, and Maintenance

Assists in planning and implementing archeological projects and provides technical assistance.

Hands-on experience in recording soil depositional sequences, site formation processes, agents of deterioration, and recommendations for enhanced documentation, treatment, monitoring, and protection programs.

Knowledge of applicable management documents such as area management reports and preservation plans.

V. Program and Project Management

Under direct supervision, may assist in the development and execution of a park, center, cluster, or office level program or project.

Ability to assist, under direct supervision, in the development and execution of a park, center, cluster, or office level program or project.

VI. Writing and Communication

Communicates, interprets, and presents information pertinent to the preservation of archeological sites and materials.

A. Writing

Ability to prepare limited scale scientific reports that will disseminate the cultural resource data derived from projects in accordance with service and agency policies.

Knowledge of basic techniques of writing technical and professional reports on the results of archeological surveys that meet professional and National Park Service standards.

Administrative skills such as preparing scopes of work, cooperative agreements, and contracts.

B. Public Interpretation/Presentation/Outreach

Knowledge and understanding of the importance of public interpretation of archeological sites and materials, outside consultations, developing partnerships, and contacts with the professional community.

Basic knowledge of techniques of conveying technical archeological information to the lay public.

Ability to work as a team member in the design and implementation of effective public interpretation programs such as popular histories, brochures, pamphlets, videos, exhibits, posters, lesson plans, and other public interpretation devices.

Knowledge of public speaking techniques.

VII. Training

Assists others in presenting training.

Basic knowledge of current policies, guidelines, standards, and technical information related to archeology.

Ability to assist others in coordinating and conducting a training session.

VIII. Safety

Insures on-the-job safety and health of all employees.

Knowledge of on-the-job safety and health considerations of the work place.

Knowledge of job safety and health hazards and safety requirements for job assignments.

DEVELOPMENTAL LEVEL (GS-0193)

Description: Archeologists possessing the competencies of the Developmental Level have the knowledge and analytical skills equivalent to a Master's Degree in anthropology, archeology, history, or a related field with specialized training in archeology. Archeologists at this level are responsible for the implementation of project-specific field and laboratory work to inventory and evaluate prehistoric and historic archeological sites; including: conducting archeological test excavations; analyzing artifacts; preparing reports (including maps, photographs and other graphics) that meet NPS and professional standards, and curating artifacts and supporting documentation to NPS standards. They assist in efforts to resolve conflicts and solve complex problems related to the protection and preservation of archeological sites and materials.

I. Professional Knowledge

Provides information and knowledge about archeological resources and provides supervision of archeological projects.

Demonstrated competence in archeology based on completion of an accredited curriculum for a graduate degree in anthropology, archeology, or a related field of study, and experience in archeological theory and methods, and in collecting, handling, analyzing, evaluating and reporting archeological information.

Comprehensive and current professional knowledge of archeology and anthropology including cultural history and theory equivalent to, at least, that resulting from completion of an accredited curriculum leading to a master's degree in anthropology, archeology, or other iscipline related to archeological studies.

Demonstrated ability to design, staff, organize, and supervise multi-phased archeological surveys.

Demonstrated ability to carry research to completion, as evidenced by the timely completion of theses, scholarly reports, papers, publications, or similar documents.

Demonstrated ability to supervise a data recovery project under the general guidance of a Principal Investigator.

Demonstrated ability to work effectively with other cultural resource professionals and specialists, amateur and professional organizations, and to be an effective member of multi-disciplinary team efforts and projects.

Completion of at least 12 months of professional experience at a supervisory level in archeological research, administration, or management, including:

Teaching archeology with an emphasis on and related to material culture, historic properties, or the prehistoric built environment of the United States and its territories; or

Administrative, project review, or supervisory experience in an historic preservation program or office (academic institution, historical organization or agency, museum, consulting firm, or similar professional institution) with an emphasis on and related to material culture, historic properties, or the prehistoric built environment of the United States and its territories.

Familiarity with the techniques of remote sensing of archeological sites, sampling strategies applicable to archeological surveys, formulation of predictive models to focus investigations of large land areas, and be able to demonstrate a facility for applying these techniques to both historic and prehistoric remains in order to assure that the most cost effective and scientifically valid techniques are used to identify and evaluate the full spectrum of expected resources.

II. Preservation Law, Philosophy, and Practice

Provides information and knowledge on the identification, evaluation, documentation, treatment, and management of cultural resources, especially archeological resources.

Ability that exceeds Entry Level in implementing legal and regulatory guidelines within the framework of project designs, compliance actions, etc.

III. Research and Inventories

Conducts and/or reviews archeological research and surveys.

A. Archeological Investigations

Incumbent has an analytic level of competency in carrying out the full range of archeological studies, including archeological surveying, testing, data retrieval, controlled collection, laboratory analysis, and other procedures.

Ability to lead and supervise archeology technicians and professional archeologists in conducting archeological monitoring, surveys, and excavations including the location of ites, recording of archeological and environmental data, and summarization of information collected.

Ability to design applicable management and planning documents such as area management reports and preservation plans.

Provides comparative data for prioritization of park and regional preservation issues.

Ability to recognize and record distinct archeological phenomena such as large and small-scale architectural components, depositional units, manmade rock engravings and paintings, and other archeological features.

Ability to carry out literature reviews and archival studies as background to developing research designs and contexts for investigations.

B. Laboratory Analysis/Conservation of Field Collections

Ability to supervise Entry Level archeologists and archeological technicians in laboratory-related procedures, including analyzing, accessioning, cataloging, and preserving artifacts, and data generated by the field activities.

Ability to prepare site information for updating the Archeological Sites Management Information System (ASMIS), theCultural Sites Inventory (CSI); the NPS Geographic Information System (GIS); and the Automated National Catalog System (ANCS+).

IV. Preservation, Treatment and Maintenance

Plans, implements, and evaluates, archeological projects and provides technical assistance.

Analytic level of competency in evaluating and assessing depositional histories, site formation processes, and agents of deterioration, recommendations for enhanced documentation, treatment, monitoring, and protection programs.

Ability to design applicable management documents such as area management reports and preservation plans.

Ability to utilize national and international archeological information management systems, such a modules of the National Archeological Database.

V. Programming and Project Management

Completes a variety of preservation projects and activities related to the management of archeological resources.

Supervises field projects and management of archeological crews on small and medium-sized projects. Assists with some aspects of project design, logistical designs, field documentation strategies, etc.

Prepares scopes of work and acts as Contracting Officer's Technical Representative in the administration of professional services contracts.

VI. Writing and Communication

Presents information on archeological and preservation topics, issues, and programs in oral and written form to NPS managers, colleagues, other professionals, and the public.

Progressive expansion of Entry Level skills to carry out public interpretation and education programs and products, outside consultations, developing partnerships, and contacts with the professional community

VII. Training

Delivers training.

Knowledge of current policies, guidelines, standards, and technical information as they related to the management of archeological resources.

Ability to initiate, manage, and deliver training programs.

VIII. Safety

Insures on-the-job safety and health of all employees supervised. Assists in the identification of job safety and health hazards and safety requirements for job assignments.

Thorough knowledge of NPS loss prevention guidelines and regulations.

FULL PERFORMANCE LEVEL (GS-0193)

Description: Archeologists possessing the competencies at the Full Performance level have the archeological and historic preservation knowledge, analytical skills, and experience with archeology and historic preservation statutes, regulations, policies, and guidelines equivalent to a Ph.D. Degree in anthropology, archeology, history, or a related field with specialized training in archeology. They have mastered the essential competencies of the Entry and Developmental levels and have achieved an advanced level of responsibility and an extensive amount of independence. They bring a high degree of expertise to their work and also make a significant contribution to the archeology and historic preservation nd programmatic basis in the management and preservation of archeological resources and lead efforts to resolve conflicts and solve complex problems related to the protection and preservation of archeological sites and materials.

I. Professional Discipline

Serves as staff expert on archeology. Designs, implements, and supervises archeological projects and programs.

Demonstrated professional competency equivalent to the education, training, and experience that includes and exceeds the standards required for Developmental Level positions. Shows ability to design, supervise, and implement multi-phased archeological projects. In addition, incumbent must demonstrate equivalent training and experience in at least one additional sub-field specialty listed below. Unless otherwise specified, experience, whether supervised or supervisory, should be acquired in time blocks of at least four weeks' duration.

A. Archeological Field Research: Can demonstrate a minimum of one year of field experience. Experience includes survey, excavation, and laboratory processing and/or analysis. Must have at lease six months of experience under the supervision of a professional archeologist, of which no more than three months can be survey. An additional five months of in-the-field work must be in a supervisory capacity. Two months of laboratory experience under the supervision of a professional archeologist must be documented. Documentation must also include a report written by the individual on the field and laboratory work being ited.

B. Collections Research: Can demonstrate: (1) at least four months of experience or training in the research of archeological collections under supervision of a specialist as documented by a written report, course transcript, or letter of reference; and (2) one year of independent experience in collections research resulting in a published or publishable report, equivalent in scope and quality to an M.A. thesis. Collections research must focus principally on the comparative treatment of archeological materials themselves and on related data, and specific archeological method of analysis must be used. The simple description and topological identification of excavated materials that is found in a normal site report is not considered collections research since it is a necessary and basic part of field research.

C. Documents Research: Can demonstrate competency in the use of published and/or unpublished documentary data (field notes; collections; catalogs, historical, ethnohistorical and ethnographic data; environmental and paleoenvironmental data, etc.) as a basis for analysis. Must have (1) at least one year's experience in archeology-related research under the supervision of a professional archeologist; and (2) prepared at least one report, of a least the scope and quality of an M.A. thesis, that organizes a body of documentary data as defined above, and analyzes this body of data to reach predictions, conclusions, or interpretations concerning the archeological record. Interpretive summaries of information without analysis of such information do not qualify under this specialization. Summaries of information designed as preludes or accompaniments of fieldwork do not qualify, unless by virtue of the quality of the analyses, the summaries are capable of standing alone as contributions to the study and/or management of the archeological record.

D. Archeological Resource Management: Archeological resource management begins with the earliest legal, fiscal, and political processes ensuring the appropriate consideration of archeological resources in a project area. It includes identification of resources; evaluation of their scientific potential, public value, and legal status; calculation of the impact of a project upon those resources; development of management options that take into account all levels of concern, as well as formulation of plans to preserve, conserve, mitigate the impact, and/or manage the resources. Management is the process that precedes, includes, and follows the various phases of archeological investigations to ensure legally sufficient and ethically appropriate approaches to archeological resources in the best interests of science and of the public.

An individual practicing archeological resource management can demonstrate one year of experience of management of archeological resources through evidence of application of laws, regulations, policies, programs, and political processes directed toward the preservation of these resources. Experience includes preparation of management plans that guide agency decision-makers, Memoranda of Agreements that address mitigation of adverse effects, scopes of work and/or cooperative agreements that carry out agency decisions, and reviews on resulting reports of investigations. Must present evidence that the plans, memoranda, scopes of work, agreements, or review recommendations were followed to completion by agency decision-makers relative to considerations of archeological research. Must document involvement on five major completed projects, at least two of which involve archeological field investigations. Conducting federally-mandated archeological surveys or data recovery projects are not considered sufficient evidence for this sub-field specialty since they are a part of normal field and collections research. Developing plans or other documents also are not sufficient evidence unless they have been followed through to completion.

E. Archeological Administration: Can demonstrate one year of experience as administrator of a program of archeological research, such as the head of a university research unit, a museum, or a corporate entity charged with carrying out archeological research. Experience includes preparation of annual or cyclical budgets, personnel and operating plans, and the preparation of proposals in response to scopes of work or grant requests which include research designs, personnel schedules, and budgets. Administration of a specific field project or serving as a principal investigator on a specific archeological project is a basic and routine part of field research and is not appropriate documentation under this sub-field specialty.

F. Historical Archeology: Historical archeology is the application of archeological techniques to sites relating either directly or indirectly to a literate tradition. Historical archeology is most often devoted to the study of sites that date to the development of literate populations since the 15th century. An individual practicing historical archeology must be knowledgeable about the recovery and interpretation of both archeological and archival data, and be familiar with the history of technology and its material remains including both artifactual components and their conservation and preservation.

Can document a minimum of one year of field and laboratory experience with sites and artifacts of an historical period, including six months of field work and eight weeks of laboratory work under the supervision of a professional historical archeologist, and 20 weeks in a supervisory or equally responsible capacity. Individual must be able to cite a report on such field research, prepared wholly or in the majority by the individual. Incumbent must also demonstrate competence in primary archival research under the supervision of a competent specialist as documented by a report, a course transcript, or a letter of reference. They must show the ability to design and execute an historical archeological study as evidenced by an M.A. thesis, Ph.D. dissertation, or a report equivalent in scope and quality.

G. Ethnoarcheology: Can demonstrate one year of experience conducting ethnoarcheological research focused on the identification of idiosyncratic and/or patterned behaviors of extant populations that may have application in the analysis and interpretation of archeological remains. Analysis may take the form of explicit problem-oriented hypothesis testing to contextual reconstructions, but should include a sound foundation in archeological, ethnographic, historical, and, in some cases, linguistical, method and theory. Experience can include field research (the ability to conduct problem-oriented archeological research in conjunction with ethnographic field techniques), archival/collections studies, and comparative studies based upon substantive archeological, ethnographic, and historical data that result in publishable monographs/reports equivalent in scope and quality to a M.A. thesis.

H. Underwater Archeology and Survey: Underwater archeology can generally be divided into prehistoric or historic sites and nautical sites (ships and their related harbor structures). Underwater archeology is not so much a separate kind of archeology as archeology in a different environment. Field techniques and artifact preservation differ from terrestrial sites; thus, emphasis is placed on qualitative data retrieval and on preservation methods. Persons specializing in prehistoric and historic underwater sites should have training and experience in archeological field research or historical archeology sub-fields with an emphasis on underwater sites, water-saturated artifacts, and preservation methods. Persons specializing in nautical archeology should be knowledgeable of both archeological and archival data pertaining to ships. Persons specializing in underwater survey should have training and experience in the operation of remote sensing devices, navigation, coastal geomorphology, and marine geology.

Can demonstrate a minimum of two weeks' field experience and training in underwater survey technique and familiarity with the general theory and application of varied remote sensing technology. Also, can provide documentation of 24 weeks of supervised underwater fieldwork and 20 weeks of supervisory underwater archeological fieldwork.

Can show experience or training in the recovery and interpretation of both archeological and archival data and, for nautical archeology, familiarity with the

history and technology of navigation and ship building. Individual should document the design and execution of an underwater archeological study as evidenced by an M.A. thesis or a published report equivalent in scope and quality.

For underwater survey, can document at least six months experience in the operation of remote sensing devices in a marine environment for the purpose of discovery and evaluation of archeological resources. Three months of this time must be supervised by a specialist in the use of underwater remote sensing devices, and documentation must include evidence of at least two weeks offshore training (or the equivalent) in the operation of various remote sensing devices. The other six months of experience must be in a supervisory or independent role. Individual should document his/her ability to set up, operate, and interpret the output of underwater remote sensing devices, including at least one type of each of the following: magnetometer, side-scan sonar, sub-bottom profiler, and bathymetric sounder. In addition, individual should document training in navigation and a background of coastal geomorphology and marine geology as these relate to discovery of archeological resources. Individual should submit at least one report resulting from an underwater survey made under his/her direction.

Materials will be preserved at underwater sites that are seldom preserved at terrestrial sites, or the requirements for preservation of material from marine or freshwater sites will differ from requirements for the same materials from land sites. Individual should demonstrate an awareness of conservation and preservation methods of all materials that might be encountered at underwater sites and know what the short and long-term requirements are for each material depending upon composition, burial conditions, and length of time that has elapsed since burial.

Can provide documentation of at least 8 weeks of supervised training in the general theory and application of stabilization and conservation methods as they pertain to waterlogged materials from both fresh and salt water.

I. Museum Studies: Can document one year's experience in the application of professional museological methods and techniques to archeological material and data. Experience from internships does not qualify for any portion of the experience requirement. Experience as a

museum administrator or curator does qualify if it involves the application of museological methods and techniques to archeological data. Examples of qualifying experience may include: educational programming and interpretation (e.g., design of exhibits) of archeological information for the public; conservation of archeological specimens; organization of modern classification and cataloging systems for archeological collections. Because the title of "curator" is variously used in museums, individuals who serve in this capacity should describe their duties and responsibilities relative to archeological collections and information.

J. Archeometric and Natural Science Research: Professional archeologists now have at their disposal a vast range of analytical techniques and methods derived from physics, chemistry, geology, zoology, botany and other physical and natural sciences. Work considered under this specialty involves the study, as part of the solution of archeological problems, of generally non-cultural phenomena that were parts of cultural systems or ecological systems. The specialty is particularly intended for work in studies such as geochronology (radiocarbon, thermoluminescence, amino acid racemization, neutron activation, archeo- and paleomagnetism, etc.); geoarcheology (including pedological studies, soil chemistry, etc.); archeobotanical and paleobotanical studies (including ethnobotany, palynology, dendrochronology, phytolith analysis, etc.); archeozoology (including trace element analyses, mammalogy, vertebrate evolution, etc.); human biology; and other similar analytical studies. In addition to the postgraduate degree with an emphasis in archeology or archeological studies, individual should demonstrate at least one year of relevant laboratory training followed by at least six months in a supervisory or independent research capacity, and the publication of a report interpreting analytical data. Persons with graduate degrees in the natural sciences who did not do a thesis/dissertation that was clearly archeological, but who have had the necessary field/laboratory experience in archeology as shown by significant publications, may qualify.

K. Teaching: Can document one academic year of full-time, college-level teaching accumulated within a five year period. Full time teaching is considered to be 12 semester hours per year; at least six hours must be on archeological topics. Direction of field schools is not admissible experience for this emphasis.

II. Preservation Law, Philosophy, and Practice

Provides information and knowledge on the identification, evaluation, documentation, treatment, and management of cultural resources, especially archeological resources.

Ability that exceeds Developmental Level in incorporating legal and regulatory guidelines into all levels of program management.

III. Research and Inventory

Conducts and/or reviews archeological research and surveys. Implements and manages park or region-wide archeological surveys and inventories.

A. Archeological Investigations

Incumbent has a theoretical/comparative level of competency in carrying out large-scale and complex archeological projects.

Ability to lead and supervise archeology technicians and professional archeologists in conducting complex archeological monitoring, surveys, and excavations including the location of sites, recording of archeological and environmental data, and summarization of information collected.

Ability to direct or supervise the maintenance of field notes and preparation of field descriptions, drawings, map, photographs, and video recordings related to archeological fieldwork.

Advanced ability in the integration of archeological and preservation data into overall park-based and regional programmatic designs.

Ability to supervise the production of literature reviews and archival studies as background to developing research designs and contexts for investigations.

Extensive knowledge of local and regional prehistoric and historic archeology to analyze and process archeological data and material resulting from fieldwork.

Advanced skills in the application of field techniques and methodologies of prehistoric and historic archeology to maintain field notes, drawings and maps related to the conduct or results of archeology survey and evaluation.

Advanced knowledge in the use of computers and a working knowledge of archeological data base and information management systems to document, manipulate, and report on the data resulting from archeological surveys. Basic knowledge of automated data storage and manipulation, word processing, and spread sheets.

Knowledge of and experience with supervisory techniques to direct the activities of professional and technical employees in subordinate positions.

Ability to understand and professionally communicate with researchers of other disciplines to design and implement interdisciplinary projects.

B. Laboratory Analysis/Conservation of Field Collections

Demonstrated ability to direct overall laboratory procedures.

Ability to prepare site information for updating the Cultural Sites Inventory (CSI); the NPS Geographic Information System (GIS); and the Automated National Catalog System (ANCS).

Extensive knowledge of methods used in laboratory analysis, artifact curation, accession, cataloging, analysis, and preservation/conservation of artifacts.

IV. Preservation, Treatment, and Maintenance

Plans, implements, and evaluates, archeological projects and provides professional assistance in overall cultural resource management programs.

Advanced ability in the integration of archeological and preservation data into overall park-based and regional programmatic designs.

V. Program and Project Management

Completes and/or supervises a variety of preservation projects and activities related to the management of archeological resources.

In addition to Developmental Level abilities, is responsible for project and integrated programmatic designs, articulation of project level studies into short and long range programmatic efforts (as defined within RMP statements), compliance consultation obligations, fiscal management, personnel management, and procurement.

Ability to integrate archeological information into program statements and useful applications to park or facility management, maintenance, interpretation, and resource protection activities.

Ability to develop and improve on national and international archeological information management systems, such as the modules of the National Archeological Database.

VI. Writing and Communication

Presents information on complex archeological and preservation topics, issues, and programs to NPS managers, colleagues, other professionals, and the public.

Ability to design and direct public interpretation and education programs, partnerships, and outreach.

Ability to design and implement effective strategies of conveying technical archeological information to the lay public in an engaging and informative manner.

VII. Training

Designs, manages, and delivers training.

Comprehensive knowledge of current policies, guidelines, standards, and technical information related to archeological resources.

VIII. Safety

Insures on-the-job safety and health of all employees supervised. Initiates efforts conforming to established local and agency safety programs to satisfy this responsibility.

Ability to identify and correct job safety and health hazards, instruct employees on safety requirements for job assignments and reviews, and report loss incidents in accordance with agency and Office of Employees' Compensation regulations.

Ability to initiate corrective measures for violations of Occupational Safety and Health Act standards and direct the periodic inspection of all work places.

National Park Service
Training and Development Division
Essential Competencies
archeolo.htm

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