Incentives
A GUIDE TO THE FEDERAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION TAX INCENTIVES PROGRAM FOR INCOME-PRODUCING PROPERTIES
Program Essentials Application Basics The Review Process Meeting the Standards for Rehabilitation Avoiding Incompatible Work

Historic Building Exterior:
New Additions to Historic Buildings

Incompatible New Additions

Right above: This incompatible addition has been placed on a secondary, but highly visible, elevation of a small historic commercial building. Although the height and scale are appropriate, the design of the addition—with its complex shapes, colors, and varying set-backs—competes with the historic building instead of being harmonious with it.
Photo: NPS files

 

Incompatible New Addition. This incompatible addition (shown) has been placed on a secondary, but highly visible, elevation of a small historic commercial building. Although the height and scale are appropriate, the design of the addition (with its complex shapes, colors, and varying set-backs) competes with the historic building instead of being harmonious with it.
Photo: NPS files

 

Right below: Not understanding how to differentiate a new addition from the historic building can result in an incompatible addition. Although the connector has been recessed slightly to separate it from the historic building, it is attached to the primary elevation of the house and its darker color emphasizes rather than minimizes it. The 2-story tower portion of the addition introduces a prominent new feature that alters the character of the historic four-square house. Photo: NPS files

Avoiding Incompatible Work: Historic Building Exterior: New Rooftop Additions to Historic Buildings

Incompatible New Addition. Although the connector has been recessed slightly to separate it from the historic building, it is attached to the primary elevation of the house and its darker color emphasizes rather than minimizes it (shown). The 2-
story tower portion of the addition introduces a prominent new feature that alters the character of the historic four-square house (shown). Photo: NPS files

National Park Service