Incentives
A GUIDE TO THE FEDERAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION TAX INCENTIVES PROGRAM FOR INCOME-PRODUCING PROPERTIES
Program Essentials Application Basics The Review Process Meeting the Standards for Rehabilitation Avoiding Incompatible Work

Historic Building Exterior:
New Rooftop Additions to Historic Buildings

 

Incompatible New Rooftop Additions

 <two photo series> Incompatible Rooftop Addition. The historic character of this unusual building has been altered by the construction of a large rooftop addition (shown). The rooftop addition negatively impacts the distinctive character-defining roofline and, thus, does not meet the Standards for Rehabilitation. Photos: NPS files

The historic character of this unusual building (left) has been altered by the construction of a large rooftop addition (right). The rooftop addition negatively impacts the distinctive character-defining roofline and, thus, does not meet the Standards for Rehabilitation. Photos: NPS files

 

Even though this 1-story rooftop addition is set back, its size and color make it highly visible and incompatible with the historic character of the building and the district. Photo: NPS files

Incompatible Rooftop Addition. Even though this 1-story rooftop addition is set back, its size and color make it highly visible and incompatible with the historic character of the building and the district. Photo: NPS files

 

How to assess the impact of a proposed rooftop addition. Constructing a mock-up  (shown) or placing a brightly colored box or banner on the roof to show the height and the location of the proposed addition can help to determine the appropriateness of a rooftop addition on a historic building. Photographs taken of the mock-up from the street below and from several blocks away can suggest how visible an addition will be and how it will impact the character of the historic building and the historic district. Photo: NPS files

 

How to assess the impact of a proposed rooftop addition

Constructing a mock-up (such as the one shown here) or placing a brightly colored box or banner on the roof to show the height and the location of the proposed addition can help to determine the appropriateness of a rooftop addition on a historic building. Photographs taken of the mock-up from the street below and from several blocks away can suggest how visible an addition will be and how it will impact the character of the historic building and the historic district. Photo: NPS files

Avoiding Incompatible Work: Historic Building Exterior: New Site Features

National Park Service