This is an image of a deteriorating clock surround on the Colorado County Courthouse, Texas, c. 1970s. Photo: NPS files.
Fitting Your Work to Time and Place
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Working on the Past in Local Historic Districts
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<< The Chrisfield Model : / PRESERVATION / REHABILITATION / RESTORATION / RECONSTRUCTION

This is an image of the property, Chrisfield, after the treatment RESTORATION has been applied. Based on documentary and physical evidence, the building is restored to its appearance in 1850. The chimney lost in the 1938 storm is replaced. New windows matching those in Merriwether’s 1850 addition are installed. The roof balustrades are re-created. All later changes to the house are removed so that only one period is interpreted. A lift to accommodate individuals with disabilities is added. Drawing: Martha L. Werenfels, AIA, 1993.

Choosing Restoration as a Treatment

What happens to the house?
Chrisfield is used as a house museum to interpret Dr. Merriwether’s life and distinguished career. Based on documentary and physical evidence, the building is restored to its appearance in 1850. The chimney lost in the 1938 storm is replaced. New windows matching those in Merriwether’s 1850 addition are installed. The roof balustrades are re-created. All later changes to the house are removed so that only one period is interpreted. A lift to accommodate individuals with disabilities is added.

<<How the Work Fits Time and Place>>

Restoring Chrisfield
Only the historic materials from the 1850 period are retained. Materials that represent other occupancies over time are demolished. Features from the restoration period are re-built in new material.

Restoration focuses on the retention of materials from the most significant time in a property's history. It permits the removal of materials from all other periods. This treatment is generally selected for interpretive purposes.

<<Key Ideas in the Standards for Restoration >>

Use the property as it was used historically or find a new use that reflects the property's period of greatest historical significance (called the restoration period).

Remove features from other periods, but document them first.

Stabilize, consolidate, and conserve features from the restoration period.

Replace a severely deteriorated feature from the restoration period with a matching feature (limited substitute materials may be used).

Replace missing features from the restoration period based only on pictorial documentation and physical evidence. Do not make changes that mix periods to create a “hybrid” building that never existed historically.

 

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