• Sunrise over the Fort George River in the Timucuan Preserve.

    Timucuan

    Ecological & Historic Preserve Florida

Talbot Islands State Parks

Real fun in the Real Florida! We invite you to explore our full range of dynamic coastal habitats and rich cultural history. From ocean to marsh to inland communities, beautiful trails provide easy access to 40 miles or shoreline and 10,000 acres of unspoiled vistas. Whether you're looking for a walk on the beach, horseback riding, kayaking, or fishing, Talbot Islands has something for you!

Choose a park area below or click here for Talbot Islands activities.

 
Dunes at Little Talbot Island

Little Talbot Island has five miles of pristine beach, picnic pavilions, a short nature loop, and a four mile hiking trail. Take a guided kayak tour of the islands. Go surf fishing, sunbathing, shelling, or nature watching!

 
Black rocks and sun-bleached trees at the beach at Big Talbot Island
Centuries of wind and water have eroded the island, creating a twenty-foot bluff along the shore. The famous boneyard beach at Big Talbot Island is covered with the skeletons of live oak and cedar trees that once grew near the ocean. The island also offers a boat ramp, trails, and picnic areas.
 
Azaleas in bloom in front of the Ribault Club
Exploring the natural and cultural wonders of Fort George Island is a great way to get out and enjoy your state park. Whether it's hiking along the 4-mile nature trail, taking the Virtual Ranger tour, strolling through the historic Ribault Club, or touring on a segway, you and your friends or family will get a taste of Old Florida.
 
Pitcher plant photographed by Kristin Ebersol at Pumpkin Hill/FPS
Pumpking Hill Creek Preserve protects 4,000 acres of uplands with ten distinct natural communities. Visitors can hike or bike the trails, canoe or kayak the creeks, or bring their own horses and ride some of the few remaining trails available to the equestrian community.
 
Horseback riding on the beach at Amelia Island State Park
Amelia Island State Park has beautiful beaches, salt marshes, and coastal maritime forests providing a glimpse of the original Florida. This park is one of the few locations on the East Coast that offers horseback riding on the beach, a 45-minute riding tour along the shoreline. Visitors can go fishing, stroll along the beach, look for seashells, or watch the wildlife.
 
Cannon on display at Yellow Bluff Fort
Yellow Bluff was an important military position during the Civil War, allowing access to the inland areas of Florida's east coast. There was never an actual fort here, but an encampment that was fortified and equipped with large guns for protection. Constructed in 1862, the site was occupied by both Confederate and Union troops and, at its peak, housed over 250 soldiers.
 
Fishing from the George Crady fishing bridge
The George Crady Bridge Fishing Pier is a mile-long, pedestrian-only fishing bridge spans Nassau Sound providing access to one of the best fishing areas in Florida. Fishermen catch a variety of fish, including whiting, jacks, drum, and tarpon. The fishing bridge is open twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year.
 
Florida Park Service logo
Photographs courtesy of the Florida Park Service/Talbot Islands State Parks.

Did You Know?

Cannon drawing

Jacksonville, Florida was invaded by the Union Army four separate times during the Civil War and two battles of significance were fought within the boundary of Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve. More...