• A water drop clings onto the edge of a orange stalactite, surrounded by white stalactites.

    Timpanogos Cave

    National Monument Utah

Nature & Science

Photo of Heart of Timpanogos Cave

Heart of Timpanogos Cave

(Jon Jasper)

Timpanogos Cave is the park's primary resource. The cave system is unique due to its high abundance of helictites, its coloration in its formations, its display of fault-controlled passages, its alpine surroundings, and unique history.

The 1-1/2 miles long paved trail with a 1,092 feet elevation gain to the cave is also a popular attraction. The trail provides spectacular views of the geology of the American Fork Canyon and the expanding cities of the Utah Valley.

Although the park is only 250 acres, there is great diversity in the amount of wildlife living here. 55 different kinds of mammals, 2 species of fish, 52 different bird species, and 4 kinds of reptiles have been sighted within park boundaries.

Timpanogos Cave National Monument Science and Resource Management staff conducts long-term inventory, monitoring, analysis, and reporting on key park resources to assess the condition of park ecosystems and develop a stronger scientific basis for stewardship and management of natural resources.

In cooperation with Resource Management staff, the Northern Colorado Plateau network works with Timpanogos Cave and 15 other parks to monitor air quality, climate, upland systems, land surface phenology, landscape dynamics, and water quality at the monument and other National Park sites. For more information go to http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/units/ncpn/parks/tica.cfm

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