• Theodore Roosevelt National Park

    Theodore Roosevelt

    National Park North Dakota

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  • Road Construction

    Visitors to the South Unit may experience up to 30 minute delays and rough road conditions due to road construction along East River Road. Check at South Unit Visitor Center for current road conditions. Updated 07/09/2014 5:16 pm MT

Elk Reduction

Park Elk Reduction Finished Ahead of Schedule

The National Park Service is moving into the maintenance phase of the Elk Management Plan in Theodore Roosevelt National Park this fall, after two highly successful elk reduction efforts during 2010-2011.

When elk reduction efforts began in 2010, the elk population in the park was over 1,200 animals. However, after two effective reduction efforts in the park and two successful hunting seasons outside park boundaries, the population is now at the lower end of the park's population objective of 100-400 elk. The park conducted an aerial elk survey in January 2012 and counted 138 elk within the boundaries of the South Unit. This reduction of the population allows the park to move into the maintenance phase of the management plan. No volunteers will be needed to assist with elk management this fall.

Because there is always uncertainty associated with counting wildlife, especially when the population is at a low number, the park must proceed cautiously with the next phase of management. Park biologists will use GPS collars and intensive monitoring this fall to refine the population estimate and determine if any removals are warranted. If monitoring indicates that the population is still at the lower end of the preferred range, then no removals will occur this year. If, however, a few animals must be removed beyond those expected to be taken outside the park during the elk hunting season, National Park Service biologists will conduct the limited removals starting in November.

Did You Know?

The Little Missouri River has carved the badlands over the last 600,000 years.

The Little Missouri River began to carve the badlands about 600,000 years ago during the Pleistocene Epoch. The river formerly ran to Hudson Bay, but the glaciers diverted it into the Missouri River. More...