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  • Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

    "A Kid's Life in Atlanta: 1864" (Guided Program)

    Everyone knows life was difficult for soldiers during the Civil War, but what about children? Through the words of a 10-year old child, students will understand the difficulties and challenges of growing up in a war-torn city.

  • Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

    "All About Artillery" - Self Guided

    This self-guided program helps students learn more the Civil War through one of its most powerful weapons, the cannon. Using a cannon identification worksheet, students are able to scrutinize artillery pieces up close to discover the various types of cannon and their fire power. There is no fee for this program.

  • Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

    "I Am a Civil War Soldier" (Self-Guided Program)

    Using the words and sentiments of actual soldiers who fought in the Atlanta Campaign, students are able to take a self-guided tour of the Battlefield's museum.

  • Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

    "What's That Smell? 1860s Hygiene" (Guided Program)

    People often dream about travelling to the past. They romanticize life in the 19th century: the fashions, the etiquette, and civilities. What they tend to overlook is a fundamental difference between then and now that would shock our time traveller: smell.

  • Fort Scott National Historic Site

    (1840s) A Hearty Grip: Fort Scott Soldiers in the Mexican-American War

    (1840s) A Hearty Grip: Fort Scott Soldiers in the Mexican-American War

    So Far From God, So Close to the United States" was the quote that one Mexican leader used to describe his perspective on the Mexican American War. The Mexican-American War led to the acqusition, by the United States, of the American Southwest. Troops stationed at Fort Scott were involved in every major campaign of that war. This program explores the ways in which those soldiers participated.

  • Fort Scott National Historic Site

    (1840s) A Map Changed by Destiny: Fort Scott and Westward Expansion

    (1840s) A Map Changed by Destiny:  Fort Scott and Westward Expansion

    In the 1840s, Westward Expansion proceeded at an astronomical rate. In less than a decade, land comprising Texas, the American Southwest, California, and the Pacific Northwest all came under control of the United States. Soldiers at Fort Scott had participated in military missions that helped bring that about. By the end of the decade the map of the nation had changed dramatically as the nation fulfilled its' Manifest Destiny of stretching from coast to coast.

  • Fort Scott National Historic Site

    (1840s) Heartache and Tragedy: Fort Scott and Indian Removal

    (1840s) Heartache and Tragedy: Fort Scott and Indian Removal

    In 1830, President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act which authorized the removal of native tribes living east of the Mississippi River. Many of the tribes had firm roots in their homes in the east and resisted the move West. Some were removed by military force which resulted in tragic consequences. This program explores the catastrophe of Indian removal.

  • Fort Scott National Historic Site

    (1840s) Trails of the Dragoons: Patrolling the Overland Trails

    (1840s) Trails of the Dragoons: Patrolling the Overland Trails

    The U. S. Army stationed dragoons at Fort Scott to limit westward expansion, but the events they participated in during the 1840s had the opposite effect. Established as peacekeepers and protectors, dragoons became agents of American expansion, power and destiny. The events in which they were involved in during the 1840s opened up the frontier for westward expansion, for the benefit of some and to the detriment of others.

  • Fort Scott National Historic Site

    (1840s) Trails of Tragedy: Three Stories of Indian Removal

    (1840s) Trails of Tragedy: Three Stories of Indian Removal

    Prior to became a atate, Kansas was part of Indian Terriitory, which also included Oklahoma and Nebraska. Several Indian tribes in the East were moved to the area forcibly. For many tribes, their forced relocation resulted in tragic consequences. This program examines the stories of three of those tribes that were relocated to the area around Fort Scott.

  • Fort Scott National Historic Site

    (1850s) Montgomery's Raid: Bleeding Kansas Play

    (1850s) Montgomery's Raid: Bleeding Kansas Play

    In 1858 Fort Scott, proponents of pro and anti slavery factions clashed here over an issue whose ramifications continue to resonate in today’s society. the climax of that year was a raid in December 1858 instigated by James Montgomery for the purpose of freeing one of his men from prison. The raid and its aftermath are portrayed in this program.