• Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument

    Sunset Crater Volcano

    National Monument Arizona

Celebrate Public Lands Day with Free Entry

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Date: September 21, 2012

Sunset Crater Volcano, Walnut Canyon, and

Wupatki National Monuments Celebrate Public Lands Day with Free Entry

Flagstaff, AZ- The Flagstaff Area National Monuments (Walnut Canyon, Sunset Crater Volcano, and Wupatki National Monuments) will be joining National Park Service units across the country in celebrating National Public Lands Day (NPLD) with fee free entry into the Monuments.

National Public Lands Day began in 1994 and is intended to encourage shared stewardship of our nation's public lands. Today, NPLD is the nation's largest hands-on volunteer effort to improve and enhance federal, state and local public lands.

This year, NPLD will be celebrated on Saturday, September 29. Visitors who arrive on the 29th will be allowed to enter the Monuments free of charge. Monument visitor centers will have Interagency Senior and Annual Passes available for those who wish to purchase them.

The National Monuments will also celebrate our public lands with the Flagstaff Festival of Science.

Additional fee-free days in 2011 will include Veteran's Day weekend (November 10 - 12.) To learn more about National Public Lands Day, please visit the NPLD web site at www.publiclandsday.org. To learn more about the Flagstaff Festival of Science, please visit www.scifest.org.

Walnut Canyon National Monument is located 10 miles east of downtown Flagstaff via I-40 and can be reached at (928)526-3367 and on the web at "www.nps.gov/waca." Wupatki National Monument is 26 miles north of Flagstaff via Hwy 89, and can be reached at (928)679-2365 and "www.nps.gov/wupa." Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument is located six miles east of down Flagstaff via Hwy 89 and can be reached at (928)526-0502 and "www.nps.gov/sucr."

Did You Know?

A firey night eruption in Hawaii

The eruption of Sunset Crater Volcano must have been a powerful event. It destroyed all plants within a 5-mile radius. A fountain of fire, 850 feet high, was visible for miles around. An ash cloud rose 2.5 miles into the sky, and falling ash covered about 64,000 acres.