National Park Service
Garibaldi in the Kelp, Channel Islands National Park Site Map of the America, Isle Royale National Park A panorama of the Windjammer wreck, Dry Tortugas National Park SRC Photographer, Brett Seymour, filming elkhorn coral in 3D, Virgin Islands National Park VALR USS Arizona Memorial SRC Archeologist documenting a feature in Channel Islands Mandalay wreck, Biscayne National Park Underwater 3D production still at KALO

Submerged Cultural Resources Reports

(Clicking on the name of the report will download the file as a PDF)

Russell, Matthew A., 2004, Comet: Submerged Cultural Resources Site Report. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 17, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

This report details the archeological documentation of the remains of the schooner Comet exposed on the beach in Simonton Cove, San Miguel Island California. It includes a discussion of contemporary nineteenth century wooden shipbuilding practices and archeological site formation processes.

Bradford, James E., Matthew A. Russell, Larry E. Murphy and Timothy G. Smith, 2003, Yellowstone National Park Submerged Resources Survey. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 16, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Part One of this report is dedicated to discussion of SRC underwater remote sensing operations in Yellowstone Lake. Part Two is a comprehensive discussion of the submerged cultural resources of Yellowstone and their significance in the prehistory and history of the region.

Murphy, Larry E. (editor), 1998, H.L. Hunley: Site Assessment. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 15, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

In April 1996, the National Park Service led an assessment survey of a vessel purported to be the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley located in outer Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. This report discusses the nondestructive remote sensing phase of the study, the test excavation procedures and the analyses of cultural materials recovered or observed in situ.

Morris, Don P. and James Lima, 1996, Channel Islands National Park and Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary: Submerged Cultural Resources Assessment. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 14, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

This work lays a firm foundation for future research and protection of the submerged cultural resources of the Channel Islands. The authors systematically discuss what's known about the submerged archeological sites from their own fieldwork and that of their colleagues. They then foreshadow the potential for future finds as suggested from archival research.

Murphy, Larry E. (editor), 1993, Dry Tortugas National Park: Submerged Cultural Resources Assessment. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 13, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Shipwrecks are one signature of the relationship between man and the ecosystem, a fact richly demonstrated in the array of sunken vessels around the Dry Tortugas. This is an “assessment” level report designed to provide a firm foundation for future research and stewardship of the archeological resources of a park.

Delgado, James P., Daniel J. Lenihan and Larry E. Murphy, 1991, The Archeology of the Atomic Bomb: A Submerged Cultural Resources Assessment of the Sunken Fleet of Operation Crossroads at Bikini and Kwajalein Atoll Lagoons. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 11, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

This report compiled by a team of underwater archeologists, illustrators and historians from the NPS Submerged Resources Center presents the results of field studies (including line drawings of shipwrecks) and archival work aimed at determining nature and significance of the sunken ships in Bikini Lagoon. The vessels sank after Atomic Bomb tests conducted in 1946. This document also includes an assessment of the recreational diving potential and risks at Bikini and recommendations for making the area’s wrecks into a park.

Carrell, Toni L., 1991, Micronesia: Submerged Cultural Resources Assessment. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 10, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

This report on the submerged cultural resources of Micronesia was generated from the results of numerous underwater projects conducted in this part of the work by the NPS SRC. Any student of Micronesian history or archeology should find it a useful overview from which to frame out more intensive research of specific submerged sites.

Murphy, Larry E., 1990, 8SL17: Natural Site Formation Processes of a Multiple-Component Underwater Site in Florida. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 12, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Understanding site-formation processes is as important to unraveling archeological riddles as is the understanding of material remains themselves. This publication seeks to correct a major weakness limiting the study of underwater archeological sites: a set of unquestioned assumptions regarding the natural and cultural processes that affect data-set preservation.

Lenihan, Daniel J. (editor), 1989, Submerged Cultural Resources Study: USS Arizona Memorial and Pearl Harbor National Historic Landmark. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 9, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

This document presents the methodology and results of a major submerged resources study. It includes line drawings of the hulks of USS Arizona and USS Utah, the largest objects ever mapped underwater. The report recounts the history of the attack, the salvage operations and the monitoring of long-term deterioration of the ship.

Labadie, C. Patrick, 1989, Submerged Cultural Resources Study: Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 8, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Although the focus of this document is intentionally confined to one portion of Lake Superior, it reflects the author’s lifelong fascination with the whole spectrum of Great Lakes Maritime traditions and thus should interest any scholar of the “Inland Seas.”

Delgado, James P. and Stephen A. Haller, 1989, Submerged Cultural Resources Assessment: Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and Point Reyes National Seashore. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 7, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

This report is the first assessment level document in the submerged cultural resources series of publications produced by the National Park Service. It serves as a model for land managing agencies that wish to generate straightforward statements on what is known about a particular submerged resource base without intensive field study. It also discusses options for exerting responsible stewardship over those resources.

Carrell, Toni L., 1987, Submerged Cultural Resources Site Report: Charles H. Spencer Mining Operation and Paddle Wheel Steamboat. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 6, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Shipwrecks and other cultural remains found in the sea, rivers, or lakes are significant only when their greater context is understood. In this site report the authors integrated underwater and traditional land archeology in a manner that permits the reader to understand the full story told by the archeological record at Lee's Ferry.

Lenihan, Daniel J. (editor), 1987, Submerged Cultural Resources Study: Isle Royale National Park. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 5, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

This report is the result of a comprehensive underwater research effort conducted at Isle Royale National Park in Lake Superior in the early 1980s. It includes a series of recommendations for future protection and interpretation of underwater archeological sites in the park.

Carrell, Toni, 1985, Submerged Cultural Resources Site Report: NOQUEBAY. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 4, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

This report details the study of remains of a historic wooden vessel located in Julian Bay on the Stockton Island. It is thought to be the schooner-barge Noquebay built in 1872 and lost in 1905. The report includes a discussion of maritime historic context, description of the archeological operations, photographs and site maps.

Carrell, Toni L., 1984, Submerged Cultural Resources Inventory: Portions of Point Reyes National Seashore and Point Reyes- Farallon Islands National Marine Sanctuary. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 3, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

This report presents the results of an evaluation and preliminary mapping of Munleon, a WWI laker class vessel lost at Point Reyes in 1931; relocation and evaluation of Richfield, a bulk oil tanker lost in 1930 and documentation and mapping of a circa 1880 schooner wharf site in Schooner Bay.

Murphy, Larry E. (editor), 1984, Submerged Cultural Resources Survey: Portions of Point Reyes National Seashore and Point Reyes-Farallon Islands National Marine Sanctuary. Submerged Resources Center Professional Report No. 2, National Park Service, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Point Reyes and Drakes Bay played an important role in the early maritime development of the San Francisco Bay region and consequently has been the location of numerous shipwrecks. This report presents the results of two underwater remote sensing studies conducted by the NPS SRC in 1982.

 

 

Last Updated: March 7, 2013