Civil Rights in America

To live freely and participate in society is a right many take for granted. Achieving and maintaining those civil rights have been a struggle for different groups throughout U.S. history. Civil rights mean more than the protests of the 1950s and 1960s and reach beyond racial and ethnic groups. Today, the struggle has gone from an issue of racial equality to equality for all and new voices are engaging in the discussion, helping to define who we are as a people and a nation.


Features

Crowds carrying signs during the March on Washington, August 28, 1963

We Are Still Marching

Visit this interactive site that captures images, news and radio footage, music, and interviews from the 1963 March on Washington.

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Photograph of the front of the 16th Street Baptist Church

16th Street Baptist Church Bombing

On Sunday, September 15, 1963, a bomb exploded at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four young African-American girls.

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President Johnson signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Civil Rights Act of 1964

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 is the nation's premier civil rights legislation. It outlaws discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, or sex

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Bayard Ruskin and Cleveland Robinson standing in front of a sign announcing the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

It was the largest gathering for civil rights of its time. 250,000+ people attended the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963.

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