Lesson Plan

Defending the Chesapeake Region!

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Grade Level:
Fourth Grade-Eighth Grade
Subject:
History, Maritime History, Military and Wartime History, Naval History, Political Science, War of 1812
Duration:
1-2 days
Group Size:
Up to 36 (6-12 breakout groups)
Setting:
classroom
Keywords:
war of 1812, Chesapeake Campaign, Chesapeake Bay, Star-Spangled Banner, Star-Spangled Banner Flag, National Anthem, Burning of Washington, Washington DC, baltimore, Fort McHenry

Overview

Students will begin by exploring the definitions of physical features found in the mid-Atlantic region. Students will then identify these features using maps of Baltimore and Washington D.C. After literally tracing the interaction of the geographic characteristics and the Washington, DC conflict on a map, students will be able to make supported predictions about how Baltimore was successfully defended. They will be able to confirm or refute their predictio

Objective(s)

Students will explain how the physical features of a place affect the way people engage in conflict by analyzing and comparing the geographic characteristics and War of 1812 battles of Washington, DC and Baltimore.



Background

War of 1812 Virtual Resource Center

Teach your students about the people, places and events surrounding the War of 1812 through media-rich interactives, more curricular resources, primary source images and documents.

war of 1812.thinkport.org

 



Materials

 Copies of map and illustrations for each group of students

Copies of student workbook for each student or group of students.

Full PDF of lesson plan contains teacher's guide and answer key.



Procedure

Motivation:

  • Teacher shows students an image of the Battle of Washington burning and shares that this is a War of 1812 battle. (Do not share additional information - this will be revealed later. You may need to cover the title of the painting).
  • Teacher asks students: What features could these soldiers have used to defend the city from their enemy? (the fort, ships, guns, cannons, etc.)
  • If students did not mention this, teacher can prompt: what roles do the NATURAL features such as the water, hills, and forests play? How can the soldiers use them to their advantage? Introduce the idea that geography greatly affects a battle's outcome and the movement of a military group.
  • Explain to students that by the end of the lesson they will know which famous U.S city they see burning in this painting.

 

Introduction to New Material:

  • Students will receive their work packets. Teacher can also decide to hand students parts of the work packet individually, as the lesson proceeds. All "Parts" and the numbers below reference handouts in the student packets.
  • PART 1: Geography and Its Interaction with Conflict #1
  • Teacher will provide students with definitions for each of the geography terms. (This can be done by writing the definitions on the board, on a transparency, handing definitions on sentence strips to various students before class and having them bring the strips up to the front of the room when appropriate, etc.)
  • Teacher will use a classroom map to show an example of each feature.
  • Students will copy the definitions and then draw a pictorial representation in their graphic organizer.
  • PART 1: Geography and Its Interaction with Conflict #2
  • Teacher will read the directions and demonstrate how to complete the chart by filling out the row "Harbor" and answering the questions "How might soldiers use this physical feature during war?" and "What challenges might this physical feature create for soldiers?"
  • Students will work in groups to fill out the remaining rows - each group will be responsible for one row. They should write their responses into the chart and on chart paper.
  • Teacher will circulate to assist.
  • Student groups will share their responses with the class; classmates will fill in the rest of their charts using the presented material.
  • Teacher will summarize key points.
  • Geographic features facilitate movement during conflict
  • Geographic features can help provide defense during conflict
  • Geographic features can help provide resources during conflict.
  • Geographic features can create challenges during conflict
  • PART 2: Geography and the Battles of Washington and Baltimore
  • Teacher will read and demonstrate the directions for #1-4. Students will need to use crayons to circle physical features on maps of Baltimore and Washington D.C. They will then answer questions that compare the physical features of these two areas.
  • Students will work in pairs to complete the work.
  • Teacher will circulate to assist.
  • Teacher will help students check their work.
  • Teacher may also choose to introduce each question one at a time, have student pairs complete it, then review the responses as a class before moving on to the next question.
  • Teacher will read the directions to #5 and then read the story "The Assault on Washington, DC"
  • Students will use a dark crayon to trace the soldiers' movement.
  • NOTE: Teacher may want to also trace the movement on a transparency to help guide students. Teacher may need to review directions with students (north, south, east, west).
  • Teacher can now reveal that the painting presented earlier during the class period was of Washington, DC.

Guided Practice:

Students will answer questions 6-9. This can take many different formats. One suggestion is to do a think-pair-share. Teacher will read question and give students one minute to "think" the answer on their own. Then students can "pair" and use 3-4 minutes to write a joint response. Then students can "share" with the class what they wrote. Using a timer is recommended.

Closing:

  • Teacher will ask students to share their answers to the questions for #3.
  • Teacher will again reiterate the key points
  • Geographic features facilitate movement during conflict
  • Geographic features can help provide defense during conflict
  • Geographic features can help provide resources during conflict.
  • Geographic features can create challenges during conflict.

Assessment

Independent Practice/Assesment:

Apply Your Knowledge!

  • Teacher will read the directions to #1
  • Students will individually complete #1 by examining the map of Baltimore and answering the questions. They will need to identify physical features on the map and then predict from where they think British soldiers will attempt to attack the city and how Baltimoreans will best be able to defend their home.
  • Teacher will read the story "Battle of Baltimore" and students will again trace the battle's route.

Extension:

See handout "Extension: Save Washington!"Students will answer the remaining questions for #3.



Park Connections

Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail

Chesapeake Bay Office of the National Park Service

Annapolis, MD

410-962-2483 

Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine

Baltimore, MD

410-962-2490

 

 



Extensions

Extension:

See handout "Extension: Save Washington!"Students will answer the remaining questions for #3.

 



Additional Resources

For additional resources dealing with the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake:

warof1812.thinkport.org



Vocabulary

Bay-Part of an ocean or a lake extending into the land and usually smaller than a gulf

River-A large stream of water that flows into a lake, ocean, or other body of water. The mouth of the river is where its waters flow into another body of water.

Creek-A small stream, usually shallow. It is generally flows into a river

Harbor-A sheltered area of water where ships can anchor safely.

Island-An area of land completely surrounded by water.

Forest-A dense growth of trees, plants, and underbrush covering a large area.

Marsh-An area of soft, wet, low-lying land, that has by grassy vegetation 

Peninsula-Land surrounded by water on all sides but one.